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#1 User is offline   Der Kartozeichner 

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:42 PM

Hey, guys. I'm lookin' to try and get the ASA on my A-5 reversed--yes, I know, don't judge. To do this, I figured I would need the following, but I'd like the smarter peoples' input:

-A5 Universal Inline Mount
-Dovetail Drop Forward
-Dovetail ASA
-2x 90 Degree Elbow Fittings
-Seven or Eight Inch Braided Hose

Coincidentally, what's a macroline?

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#2 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 05:18 PM

Macroline is a nylon hose that is slid into push fittings and replaces your stainless steel braided air line.
Easily adjusted to length by cutting with a simple razor knife.

Makes the removal of said airline a matter of pushing in the release collar and sliding the macroline out as apposed to the need of wrenches to unscreww the hose.

Convinient, easy and has been a standard in the paitnball industry since about 2001 or so, so it is prooven tech that works.
As with anything else though there can be failure in the part if used improperly, so if you really do not know how to use it I suggest going to a place that make hose lines and ask to be schooled in the proper use of macroline and the fittings so you understand the proper method of cutting the line and use of the parts together for high pressure air delivery.

This post has been edited by Krazy8: 04 October 2010 - 05:20 PM

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#3 User is offline   slinkyaroo 

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:24 PM

You'll also need a straight fitting and an ASA plug. You can't take the braided line off of the A5 tombstone fitting.

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#4 User is offline   Der Kartozeichner 

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:54 PM

Design flaw on the tombstone fitting.. right, I'll add that to mah list.

Thanks for the information, Krazy. I've heard those are more prone to breaks than braided lines, is that true? They're a cheap replacement anyhow, but still.

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#5 User is offline   cdrinkh20 

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 10:03 PM

Der Kartozeichner, on 04 October 2010 - 07:54 PM, said:

Design flaw on the tombstone fitting.. right, I'll add that to mah list.

Thanks for the information, Krazy. I've heard those are more prone to breaks than braided lines, is that true? They're a cheap replacement anyhow, but still.


Alternatively, you could run it from the tombstone using those 90 degree elbows (if you had one screw right into the ASA). You were probably planning that.

Always was curious how my VSC Phantom would feel "Island" style.
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#6 User is offline   ger 

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 07:43 AM

If you haven't already read it: LINK
ger
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#7 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 12:03 PM

To answer the prone to failure question...yes it will fail more often the stainless steel braided airline.

But to put it in perspective you need to consider what you are using for a propelant.

CO2 has a variable pressure based on the external tempurature of the enviroment the tank is being used in. Those input pressures can vary from 400psi in extreme cold to 1800pai in extreme heat. Couple that high pressure with exposure to direct sunlight and you push the operating pressure of nylon air supply line (macroline) wel past its ability to contain the pressure and it fails.
Stainless steel braided (SSB) line usually does not see this type of failure do to the fact that the actual air line is incased in a woven mesh of metal creating a much higher level of pressure ressitance prior to failure.

If you are peridically using CO2 as a source of propenant on your marker then I suggest using a SSB air line for safety.

In the higher end superguns that are able to use CO2, the high pressure air (HPA) tanks deliver a very controled output pressure to the gun. Typically these pressures run from 400 to 850 psi and tend not to fluctuate unless there is a failure in the regulatory system on the tank itself. Therefor using macroline in these situations tends to be very safe with very little if no failure.

In the ten or so years I have been using macroline I have had only one such failure do to improperly manufactured line. The inner diameter of the macroline had a thick side and thin side...kind oval inside. This resulted in the thin side failing under pressure. It is now something I look at every time I install macroline and i do not hesitate to throw away a piece I think might fail. I tend to keep a couple feet of Macro with me at all times in case of failure in my own gear of anyone else at the field...the stuff is terribly cheap and having a piece handy can mean the difference of going home or enjoying the rest of the day for a player.

The single most comon failure point in the whole system is the oring that is inside the push fitting. If that oring develops a nick from inserting the macroline or simply flatens out over time then air starts to leak from the fitting. More often than not you can stop the air leak by moving the macroline around in the fitting, but after a time that techinque fails to seal the leak and you are forced to either replace the oring or the entire fitting.
Most players find it easier to replace the fitting and in all actuallity it is most likely the safest option in the long run.
High pressures constantly running through those parts....and those parts tending to be in close proximity to your face/head...I just like to put on new ones.

Persoanlly I feel the convienence of the Macroline/push fitting system outweighs the SSB and I have not use SSB in a good long time.
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#8 User is offline   The Bear 

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 04:33 PM

cdrinkh20, on 05 October 2010 - 01:03 AM, said:

Always was curious how my VSC Phantom would feel "Island" style.


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My brother loves his, he used a 13ci hpa tank, CP rail and on/off ASA, and macroline. Balances great with a Stiffi, awesome for CQB.

I've used both SSB and Macroline, and have had equal failures in my personal experience (Both CO2). Never had an issue running macro with HPA, and its so much easier to work with.


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