Special Ops Paintball: A Friendly Reminder... - Special Ops Paintball

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A Friendly Reminder... Not just poison Ivy, but ticks too!

#16 User is offline   slinkyaroo 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 09:28 AM

"He ghost is that a neck protector?"


"nope, flea collar."
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#17 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 12:04 PM

View PostKnightwolf16, on May 31 2007, 08:34 AM, said:

Don't forget that ticks aren't the only insect that can carry disease. Mosquito's are an even bigger thread and can carry yellow fever, malaria, EEE, and a number of other potentially fatal diseases.


That is true... if u look at most of the consumer sold tick specific sprays and stuff, they all work against mosquitos as well... ive currently run all my camo and soft gear through a soak application a friend of mine had laying around... so far so good. but even still with using any product, still check urselfs after you leave the woods just in case... better safe than sorry!

now, off to buy a new gun to replace my stolen one...
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#18 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 12:15 PM

Ticks can't bite through clothing. mosquitos can. We were playing one day behind a friend's house and its a little on the swampy side. We sprayed the bug spray on and I still ended up with about 60 bites on each of my legs. Keep in mind, I had a full set of fatigues on and the bug spray (which was OFF) just didn't seem to work even though it was at least 30% DEET and I had put it on about 30 minutes prior to be eaten alive!!!
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#19 User is offline   DaggerBurn 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 12:25 PM

View PostKnightwolf16, on May 31 2007, 03:15 PM, said:

Ticks can't bite through clothing. mosquitos can. We were playing one day behind a friend's house and its a little on the swampy side. We sprayed the bug spray on and I still ended up with about 60 bites on each of my legs. Keep in mind, I had a full set of fatigues on and the bug spray (which was OFF) just didn't seem to work even though it was at least 30% DEET and I had put it on about 30 minutes prior to be eaten alive!!!



you may want to try the lemon eucalyptus alternative to deet for the mosquitos. deet seems to be best for ticks. the eucalyptos seems to work best on mosquitos
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#20 User is offline   The Angry Platypus 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 02:33 PM

View Postpaintslinger99, on May 27 2007, 06:14 PM, said:

this should be stickied if a mod is reading this


Seconded.


View PostKnightwolf16, on May 31 2007, 11:34 AM, said:

Don't forget that ticks aren't the only insect that can carry disease. Mosquito's are an even bigger thread and can carry yellow fever, malaria, EEE, and a number of other potentially fatal diseases.



What is EEE? West Nile Virus? I probably know what it is, but just not the Acronym.
Thalassa kai pur kai gune, kaka tria.
To gar hedu, ean polu, ou ti ge hedu.
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#21 User is offline   thebostinian 

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 12:31 PM

mosquitoes are bad, yes, but there's nothing as bad as finding ticks 2-3 days after a game. i checked myself that nite, but i missed the one the underside of my balls until i showered again the next day. wound up on meds for 3 weeks to prevent lyme disease.

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#22 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 02:58 PM

View Postthebostinian, on Jun 1 2007, 12:31 PM, said:

mosquitoes are bad, yes, but there's nothing as bad as finding ticks 2-3 days after a game. i checked myself that nite, but i missed the one the underside of my balls until i showered again the next day. wound up on meds for 3 weeks to prevent lyme disease.

ouch, sorry to hear about that one... thats rough... but yea, they say ur armpits, inner ear, behind ur ears, and down in that region are the most easily missed spots that you can find one... or more... and again, im sry to hear about that one thebostinian... <<Cringes>>
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#23 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 06:53 PM

View PostThe Angry Platypus, on May 31 2007, 05:33 PM, said:

View Postpaintslinger99, on May 27 2007, 06:14 PM, said:

this should be stickied if a mod is reading this


Seconded.


View PostKnightwolf16, on May 31 2007, 11:34 AM, said:

Don't forget that ticks aren't the only insect that can carry disease. Mosquito's are an even bigger thread and can carry yellow fever, malaria, EEE, and a number of other potentially fatal diseases.



What is EEE? West Nile Virus? I probably know what it is, but just not the Acronym.


Eastern Equine Encephalitis-mosquito born, resembles the flu and lasts 2-3 weeks, 25% fatal and survivors usually have neurological problems
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#24 User is offline   Pilot_Mon 

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 05:45 PM

Top this i could not find any bug spray so when i got home i pulled off 7 TICK ! gah i wish the would burn in the earths core !!!!!!! lol
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#25 User is offline   DaggerBurn 

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 06:15 AM

to stop ticks and chiggers I bought bugskins from cabela.

its like a camoflage nylon stocking shirt and pants that keeps ticks and chiggers from biting. so far i've only had one tick on me this year. friends have had over 20 so far.
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#26 User is offline   Breeman 

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 07:29 PM

Heres the information that WebMD has on the various tick born illness coman in North America

Quote

Rocky Mountain spotted fever
Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial infection passed to humans by wood ticks and dog ticks that can lead to life-threatening complications, such as shock and kidney failure, if it is not treated promptly. Initial symptoms usually start an average of 7 days after the tick bite and include a sudden fever, severe headache, muscle and joint aches, distinct rash, and nausea and vomiting.

The rash is usually made up of many tiny, flat, purple or red spots (petechial rash). It usually starts on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet, then spreads to the arms and legs and the rest of the body.

It is also called tick fever, spotted fever, or tick typhus. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is found in the southeastern, western, and south-central United States.

Tularemia
Tularemia, also called deerfly fever or rabbit fever, is a disease that usually occurs in animals. However, the disease can be transmitted to people through infected insects or animals or by exposure to contaminated water or dust.

Humans are most commonly infected through:

Being bitten by a tick, deerfly, or mosquito.
Skinning, dressing, or handling diseased animals.
Drinking water that is contaminated with urine or feces.
Inhaling contaminated dust.
This disease is found throughout the United States, but most cases are reported in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Symptoms usually start within 21 days (but average 1 to 10 days) after the tick bite or other exposure. Symptoms of tularemia include:

Chills and high fever up to 106 F, often starting suddenly.
Headache that is often severe.
An open crater-like sore (ulcer) at the site of the bite.
Swollen glands near the site of the bite.
Nausea and vomiting.
Prescription medication is used to treat tularemia.

Ehrlichiosis
Ehrlichiosis is an infectious disease that can be passed to humans by ticks. It causes fever, chills, headache (often severe), general ill feeling (malaise), nausea and vomiting, and a purple or red rash.

Symptoms usually start from 1 to 21 days (average of 7 days) after the tick bite. Ehrlichiosis is usually treated with prescription medication.

The disease most frequently occurs in the southern and south-central United States, especially in Georgia, Missouri, and Oklahoma.

Relapsing fever
Relapsing fever is an infectious disease that can be passed to humans by ticks. Relapsing fever is most common in the western United States.

Symptoms usually start 3 to 11 days (average 6 days) after the tick bite. They may last for several days, go away, and then return (relapse) several days later. Symptoms of relapsing fever include:

High fever that begins suddenly.
Headache, often severe.
Rapid heart rate.
Muscle aches (myalgia).
Abdominal pain.
General feeling of illness (malaise).
Rash (up to 50% of cases).
Prescription medication is used to treat relapsing fever.

Colorado tick fever
Colorado tick fever is an infectious viral disease that can be passed to humans by ticks. Colorado tick fever occurs in the mountain region of the western United States.

Symptoms usually start within 14 days (average of 3 to 6 days) of the tick bite. Symptoms of Colorado tick fever include:

Fever and chills.
Headache, often severe.
Muscle aches (myalgias).
Sensitivity to light (photophobia).
Medical treatment can help relieve the symptoms of Colorado tick fever.

Babesiosis
Babesiosis is a rare parasitic disease that can be passed to humans by deer ticks.

Babesiosis may not always cause symptoms. When present, symptoms usually start 1 to 4 weeks after the tick bite. Symptoms of babesiosis include:

A general feeling of illness (malaise).
Decreased appetite.
Tiredness.
Fever, chills, and sweats that come and go.
Muscle aches (myalgias).
Babesiosis usually is treated with antibiotic medications.

Lyme disease
Lyme disease is an infection that is spread by the bite of ticks infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

Symptoms include fatigue, headache, stiff neck, fever, muscle or joint pain and swelling, and sometimes an expanding red rash. If a rash does develop, it may look like a target or "bull's-eye" in some people. Lyme disease can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to many other conditions, and tests do not always detect the bacteria.

Lyme disease is usually effectively treated with a short course of antibiotics. If not treated promptly, however, it can lead to complications involving the heart, nervous system, joints, and skin within weeks, months, or even years later.


Thats all the information they have on the type found here in North Amarica. Sucks to be me becuse im showing symptoms of Babesiosis. Could be something else, or it could be Babesiosis. I'm scheudleing a docters appointment tommorow to see whats wrong.
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#27 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 10:45 AM

I kno this post is from last may, but i really feel it should be sticky'd for the fact that IT IS A SAFETY issue, and i made this post with the utmost importance to how to properly identify and remove ticks.. PLEASE CAN A MODERATOR MAKE THIS A STICKY!

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#28 User is offline   mtaylor 

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 05:02 PM

It is a sticky...

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#29 User is offline   Psycho_Ninja 

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 08:07 PM

I was just about to make a post about this very same topic. This weekend i got bit by a tick, i got most of it out but unfortunately the head was still stuck inside me so i had to get it removed. The doctor gave me a prescription to prevent any tick borne bacteria. I never took too much notice to ticks and such but next time I play Im going to take the time out to tighten up open clothing and use bugspray to prevent ticks form getting to my skin in the first place.
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#30 User is offline   Omega Sniper 

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 09:42 PM

I like to add a safety feature!!
It might have already been posted but your gona hear it again if it has!

If you ware boots when playing woodsball, tuck your pant leg INSIDE the boots. This will keep ticks from crawling up your leg.
This will also help with other harmful creatures like...

Snakes (it wont keep them from biting you but it helps trust me it saved my butt one time!)
Spiders
Ticks
and other creepy crawly that might send you to the hospital, or kick the bucket.


I like to add a story that happen to me that proves that it might help with snakes.

Well i was not playing paintball but i was cutting hay. Well any of you that has done this before knows that every thing crawls on you, well i tuck my pant leg in boots when i cut hay also, well i was cutting and when pushing in the brakes on the tractor, my leg felt a bit heavy. Well i dont know how and i didnt see it come up on the tractor, but a snake was hanging off my pant leg, mouth shut on my pants (the pants saved me from getting teeth inside my leg). If i did not tuck my pants it could of went up my leg and bite me with out any thing to help.


So keep that in mind, get you a pare of ankle high foot ware and from long pants (im sure most of you ware them when playing paintball any way)
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