Special Ops Paintball: Best Footwear for Woodsball - Special Ops Paintball

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Best Footwear for Woodsball Rate Topic: -----

#31 User is offline   kaosukoden 

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 09:54 PM

haha, that's fine... I work in Concord/Kannapolis area, but I know a few guys in Charlotte and Gastonia...
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#32 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 09:31 AM

View PostPirate, on 08 February 2011 - 02:10 PM, said:

Krazy, do you have any experience with the Mudroc's? Specifically the 290?
If I can't get they money in time to order some of the last 240's, I might grab those.

I actually need the ankle support. I've sprained mine so many times in soccer, basketball, football, and paintball (in both high and low top shoes). Though I've changed how I run a bit, it still helps to have that added protection.


Yes I do. The original Mudroc was a 288 in a black and lime green color pattern. That shoe is the reason our team approached Inov8 with the paintball idea. They saw it as a good choice to market the shoes...but their idea of a sponsorship turned out to be purchasing a marketing territory from them and hitting every paintball and adventure running event in the area.

Anyway, the Mudroc 288 offers a mix between the seriously low top and light weight construction of the X-Talon and the heavier meaty build on the Mudclaw with a bit heavier material, ankle support and tread kinda inbetween.
The tread is a more molded design with the heel and sole shaped to match the human foot. Offering a close feel of the ground. The traction is not soft rubber like mine, but firmer and lasts longer.

We have a few on the team, and most folks love them. My wife however gets serious foot pain from hers so I can not stress snough the fact that people should tyr them on prior to purchase if you can or purchase from web sites that offer free return shipping and no replacement fees!

The Mudroc 290 is the next model up from the 288 of the past and looks much better. No one I know has purchased it, so my conclusion comes fromthe demo model I had on hand for a while.

View PostLocknpump, on 08 February 2011 - 05:50 PM, said:

Krazy those Inov roclite-312's look awesome, thanks for that post man.

If you like the look of the 312....consider the 275 asa well. The weight difference is noticable. And I have found in our sport shoe color means nothing! Unless you have a habbit of leaving your feet outside of cover when you play!


If anyone cares....check out the rest of that Inov-8 site. They offer some very good information on thier products and who they can make your game a bit better. Even if they are aiming their marketing at the adventure running crowd! The same goes for us, they just don't quite know it!

This Traction guide shows of all their tread patterns and lets you see the differences between the models side-by-side.
Use the Technical tab to find out what all the little icons and crap mean onthe left side of their individual shoe discriptions.
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#33 User is offline   Rathje 

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 09:44 PM

I know this is an old post, but I wanted to chime in on krazy8's remark about high-top boots.

They suck for paintball if you plan to run in the woods. krazy8 is right, they simply weaken your legs, make it so you can't feel the ground and make adjustments, are heavy, and they actually increase the risk of rolling your ankle.

Happened to me at a scenario game. I'd been wearing my low top hiking shoes in the woods for most of my paintball games in the woods and been doing fine. Then I finally gave in to all the insistence on this forum and other places that boots are the way to go in the woods and wore them to a one-day scenario game. So I put on my all-leather high top hiking boots by Asolo.

I was making a rush for cover under fire and tried to pivot and change direction - my boot rolled to the side and it took my ankle with it. I managed to hobble off the field, but was in real pain lying down. Laced my boot up super-tight tight and managed to play for another half hour just by combining crawling with limping and hopping. Then the game ended and I drove home with my ankle throbbing. Next morning, my ankle was a third larger than my uninjured one. Took me three months to recover from that.

What happened was that the Asolo boots turned my entire foot into one big block of hard rubber. I couldn't feel the ground, had no idea what I was stepping on most of the time, and when my boots "tipped over" they yanked the rest of my ankle with them. The injury was three times worse than it would have been in low tops, because the block-like shape of the boots put extra leverage on my ankle as I went down. Low tops would have bent freely and not obstructed my ankle from bending naturally to compensate for the fall.

The advice to wear hiking boots in the woods for paintball is NOT GOOD ADVICE.

Let's stop and think a moment about what hiking boots are designed for.

Are they designed for running?

No.

Are they designed for jumping a fallen tree at running speed?

No.

Are they designed for rapidly scrambling up a rock?

No.

Here's what they are designed for: plodding along at less-than-walking speed with an 80 pound pack on your back.

That's what they are designed for. Slow, deliberate movement, under heavy weight. On a trail.

Does that sound like paintball to you?

Unless you're a Hammer, I would say no.

What about hunting boots?

Also a bad idea.

Face it, hunters don't run. If they have to run, it means they're doing the hunting thing wrong. Most of hunting involves sitting in a hide hanging in a tree or somewhere else and waiting for the deer to wander past. Or slowly walking through a field hoping to spook a pheasant. The biggest strain a hunter is going to face is HIKING to the location, and dragging a deer over rough terrain.

Got that? SLOW movement, DELIBERATE movement. Not paintball.

So what sport out there is most like paintball?

Trail running. I took up trail running in an attempt to rehabilitate my ankle (along with swimming). Bought some low top trail running shoes from a top notch running shoe store in Boulder where the staff actually film your feet and see how your ankles align - then recommend a shoe that compensates for it the best, and hit the trails.

They work fantastic, and they work for paintball as well. They're light, they grip the ground perfectly, I can feel what I'm running over and compensate. I ran over rocky mountain trails all summer last year and never even felt at risk of injury. I'll never bring a boot to a paintball game again - unless I've totally wrecked my feet or ankles and don't plan to move fast anyway. The things are death traps for your ankles.
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#34 User is offline   cdrinkh20 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 07:40 AM

Indeed:

http://www.footlocke...-sensor-4-mens/

I'm interested in those Inovs but I have these for now :) besides... I tried cleats my first time out and a LOT of my main field is hard, dry, packed dirt. *clack* *clack* *clack* :P waaaay too loud on certain fields.
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#35 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 09:54 AM

Cleats are a pretty broad description. Prior to my playing in the 212s I used the Under Armor HammerII Mid cleats. And befor those I used the Nike Land SharkII Mid.

Both the Hammer and the Land Shark share flexable non-shanked soles utilizing a flexable rubber cleat. No clackclackclak even on concrete.
Both were designed for football with the school level player in mind.

I never recommend a rigid sole in our sport. The need for flexability in highly variable terraign with both forward and lateral traction is paramount. I have seen quite a few of my friends try out baseball and line man cleats with the rigid plastic soles...always ends up with them in a great deal of pain. SPeedball is a different game with different needs that lead to players using the sprinter cleats and loving it. Us woods players need the aggrestive light weight traction of a sprinter and the full soled grip of a trail runner.

If you are looking at cleats...typically the Hammer and Land Shark are very good options in our sport, as well as they seem to be less expensive alternatives. I never payed more then $40 for my cleats. Inov8s are a different story and I am willing to pay the extra for a far superior shoe.
Those Asics do not offer enough traction for me...but that is me and not you!

Thanks Rathje for the back up and personal experience. While I have not turned my ankle to that extreme i have experienced the same thing. Did not matter the brand for me...Rocky, Hi-Tech, 7.11 and a few other tactical brands I forget I had the same experiences. I use those boots for work and blowing snow now!
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#36 User is offline   cdrinkh20 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:41 AM

Mostly just have them because my feet are screwy so I need that sort of support underneath - and my friend is manager so I get discount :P haven't been able to try them on the field yet. Got them early because I had no grip left on my regular asics and I was nearly falling all over on this ice... mind you no regular shoe is good in ice but these help.
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#37 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:53 AM

Ummm...the Inov8 OROC has steel studs built into the rubber cleats....for traction on ice and solid rock surfaces.....just sayin'

This post has been edited by Krazy8: 14 February 2011 - 10:53 AM

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#38 User is offline   cdrinkh20 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:32 AM

Haha, yes, I acknowledge the extreme specialization of the shoes.

I'll have to check out a dealer to see how close their sizes are, but I like what I see. I'd definitely have to build foot muscle though!
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#39 User is offline   Rathje 

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 11:20 PM

Just went in today to get professionally fitted for some new trail runners. Asked about the Inov8 line (since the store carried them). They recommended against them in my case, because I tend to pronate my feet when walking and running. And the Inov8 line isn't good for pronaters - but probably fine for others.

I highly recommend getting someone who knows what they are doing fit you for shoes. It makes a big difference.

Oh, I went with the Vasque Velocity trail runner. Just better support, fit and stability than the others I tried on at the store.
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#40 User is offline   whsoccerjc21 

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 10:11 PM

Okay I just wanted to point out that combat boots are designed for this kind of stuff. I don't think the military would be requiring people to wear combat boots if they didn't work in combat. Paintball is designed to mirror combat. They are designed for running, jumping, sliding, changing directions, and give plenty of protection. Now obviously for useful ones your gonna need to shell out some more cash but they will do their job.

Also not saying anything against the stuff you guys are suggestion, just my opinion.
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#41 User is offline   cdrinkh20 

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 12:06 AM

I think combat boots are more designed for wear under any conditions, and for keeping the elements out. For our purposes, we generally don't have to go through swamps, deserts, etc. and deal with it for 12 hours at a time without a break or putting on different shoes, etc.

The high top boots help to keep out some of the elements, but I suspect part of it IS to get by how few people have built up foot/ankle muscle these days.
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#42 User is offline   Krazy8 

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 07:39 PM

I disagree greatly with the paintball mirroring combat idea. 99.9% of what I do while playing paintball I would never even consider trying during combat.

Combat boots are a utility boot. Designed to do everything, but nothing really specific. To that measure, yes they work.

For most average rec players combat boots are perfect. A good blend of protecion and traction.

For me they are restrictive, heavy and clumsy.
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#43 User is offline   whsoccerjc21 

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:51 PM

View PostKrazy8, on 24 February 2011 - 10:39 PM, said:

I disagree greatly with the paintball mirroring combat idea. 99.9% of what I do while playing paintball I would never even consider trying during combat.

Combat boots are a utility boot. Designed to do everything, but nothing really specific. To that measure, yes they work.

For most average rec players combat boots are perfect. A good blend of protecion and traction.

For me they are restrictive, heavy and clumsy.

And what exactly do you do in paintball that people in combat don't do? Just because you wouldn't do that in combat doesn't mean that real soldiers don't. I mean you might not think of a soldier as sprinting or jumping, sliding or anything else, but trust me they do. Especially if it could save their or another persons life.
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#44 User is offline   IrishMack 

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:04 PM

You can run, jump, slide and sprint in combat boots it's true...but if you think about what they are generally used for...a lot of it is marching, not running...
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#45 User is offline   Cuy'val Dar  

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:13 PM

Man. I like those innivates except that they don't go to size sixteen...
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