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PCS US5 Review Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Gero 

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:56 AM

This is an update of a review I did last year. I am surprised that this marker is not more popular than it is. It has great features at a bargain price.

Iím a woods ball player. I started playing in 1987. I have owned a PCS US5 for two seasons. I also own a Dangerous Power Fusion and a couple other older markers. I like the Fusion very much, but most often I use the US5.

Features.
The PCS US5 is a high pressure, in-line design marker. It works well with both high-pressure air/nitrogen and CO2. It has a fairly loud report and more recoil kick than my Fusion and for that matter probably most every low-pressure marker.

The US5ís right side, offset ball-feed allows you to sight straight down the barrel. It has both 3/8th and 7/8th sight rails on the top.

The marker is equipped with a short Spyder/Pirahna threaded barrel.

The electronic version of the PCS US5 has an MSRP of $179.95. The manual version is $129 and can be easily upgraded to the electronic version by purchasing the electronic grip separately.

The PCS US5 looks like a Tippmann A5 without the cyclone loader. It has a rear pistol grip, a broomstick-style front grip and MP5-style sights.

The rear portion of the rear pistol grip is removable/replaceable. The electronic PCS US5 comes with two grip inserts. One houses the trigger electronics and a battery well. The other is basically empty restricting the trigger to manual semi-automatic mode. When using the E-grip the marker features an electronic trigger w/tourney lock semi-automatic, unlocked semi-automatic, 3 shot burst or fully automatic. As you would expect, the electronic grip provides a lighter trigger pull than the manual grip. The lighter touch of the electronic grip combined with the use of a stock allows me to stay on target as I deliver several rapid-fire shots. The markerís rate of fire is 10 balls per second on fully automatic.

The electronic grip provides modular trigger electronics rather than a circuit board that is installed into the frame. The E-grip is fully self-contained so there are no wires to pinch and no circuits to cross or chip. It can be installed or removed in seconds. The PCS US5 comes with a rechargeable battery and charger.

As I mentioned above, the marker comes with a second, manual grip. With this grip installed the trigger is slower. But, it is nice to have for those days when it is threatening rain and you donít want to chance exposing your electronic grip to rainwater.

The US5 has a side-cocking handle designed to protect the markerís internals from dirt, paint and other debris.

Reliability
I have used my PCS US5 for two full years. I have yet to miss a game because my PCS US5 was not operating properly. I disassemble my marker to clean it after each day of use but thatís not always necessary. I lightly lubricate the marker once before each day of play.

The ball feed flips down to allow the use of a pull-through squeegee. I almost never chop paint with my PCS US5. I have had very good luck shooting Chronic, Scorch, Ramp, X-ball Silver and Nightmare paintballs with this marker.

Durability
After two years of frequent use the marker looks practically new. I have not replaced a single component due to wear. I did destroy a ball detent when I accidentally installed it backwards. I have also replaced a hammer spring that was bent when I bought the marker. When assembling the US5 it is important to do so with the marker in the charged (rear) position to avoid bending the hammer spring.

Ease of use
Using the manual trigger, operation is simple: press the safety to fire mode and go play. When using the electronic trigger add the following two steps: turn on the electronic grip and select a firing mode.

The selector for setting the firing mode is a single silver button on the outside of the marker near the top of the grip. Each push cycles to the next of three firing modes: semi-automatic, three round burst and fully automatic. There is no indication, LED or otherwise to which mode the marker is set.

The tourney lock is also on the grip but must be set before installing it as the switch is concealed when the grip is in place.

Ease of Maintenance
I do not consider the PCS US5 to be easy to clean. It shares a clamshell design with many other in-line design markers. Consequently, it is not easily field-strippable. You need to disassemble the entire marker to thoroughly clean it. However, you can accomplish some cleaning without disassembling the marker. Leave the marker fully assembled, but remove the barrel and flip down the ball feed, at which point you can see a large amount of the bolt. With some water in a spray bottle you should be able to do a fair job of cleaning a chop without fully disassembling the marker.

One aspect of the PCS US5 design that does contribute to ease of maintenance is the trigger assembly. Like the electronic grip, the trigger assembly is a single, self-contained piece, no loose tiny pins or springs.

I consider the US5 to have average gas efficiency.

Upgradeability.
The PCS US5 accepts Tippmann A5 or grip bottom stocks. The top of the receiver is milled to allow the use of sights with either 3/8Ē or 7/8Ē mounts. The US5 accepts Spyder/Pirahna threaded barrels.

Upgrades I have chosen:

Stock.
Iím currently using a PCS SAW stock. I have also installed a carry handle/sight rail on which I have mounted a red dot sight. Using the carry handle/sight rail raises the sight picture enough that my mask does not get in the way when I use the red dot sight.

Electric hopper.
I use a Ricochet 2KX with my US5. The 2KX uses a single 9-volt battery and is rated to support up to 14 balls per second. It works very well with the PCS US5.

Barrel kit.
The US5ís stock barrel has a fairly large bore. I found that using small bore paint with the stock barrel diminished accuracy and gas efficiency. So, I purchased an Evil Pipe barrel kit with several different size backs and fronts. I also own a BT Apex barrel. I use the Apex on wide-open fields. But most often I use the barrel kit.

Red dot (shotgun) sight.
I use the Armson Pro Dot red dot sight. I only use the sight for the first shot of each engagement but I feel that it really pays dividends. I seldom have to adjust subsequent shots for deflection, only for elevation.

Regulator.
I use both HPA and CO2 so I looked for a regulator that works well with both. I chose the Palmer Pursuit Shop Stabilizer. While this is not a necessary upgrade, the stabilizer has reduced the variation of my markerís readings at the chronograph station. I donít like my markers to shoot much over 280 FPS. Without the stabilizer I set the velocity at 270 FPS, with the stabilizer I bump it up to 275 FPS. People claim that less variation in velocity results in improved accuracy. That makes sense to me, but I havenít done any comparison testing.

Summary.
In my opinion, the PCS US5 is a very good woods ball marker and at $180, a genuine bargain.
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#2 User is offline   MOCA 

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 11:10 AM

Great review! Very informative and I agree with you on everything ( since I have one too). I am also surprised at the lack of popularity in this marker since it is a bargain; especially when you can get the electric/mechanical version for $60 like I did. B) The only thing I can't compare with is the durability since I have only had mine for a month or two and it hasn't seen much use. But like I said before great review!
-MOCA B)

MOCA motto- Silentium Trucidat "Silence Kills". Originator of MOCA Masters Of Camouflage and Ambush
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#3 User is offline   Gero 

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 03:42 PM

Thanks.

One of the larger fields in my area uses the field version of the US5 for their rentals and they are holding up very well. So, I don't expect long term durability to be a problem.

We have four people in our club with US5s. We all like them.
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#4 User is offline   shadow_772 

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 09:00 AM

Nice review. A teammate of mine won a US-5 in a drawing after a scenario. I used it once and besides the fact reballs suck, it worked great. The reball thing was really mainly the hopper though. Great review though.
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#5 User is offline   Ganglyfreak 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 11:32 AM

View PostGero, on Jan 18 2008, 11:56 AM, said:

This is an update of a review I did last year. I am surprised that this marker is not more popular than it is. It has great features at a bargain price.

Iím a woods ball player. I started playing in 1987. I have owned a PCS US5 for two seasons. I also own a Dangerous Power Fusion and a couple other older markers. I like the Fusion very much, but most often I use the US5.

Features.
The PCS US5 is a high pressure, in-line design marker. It works well with both high-pressure air/nitrogen and CO2. It has a fairly loud report and more recoil kick than my Fusion and for that matter probably most every low-pressure marker.

The US5ís right side, offset ball-feed allows you to sight straight down the barrel. It has both 3/8th and 7/8th sight rails on the top.

The marker is equipped with a short Spyder/Pirahna threaded barrel.

The electronic version of the PCS US5 has an MSRP of $179.95. The manual version is $129 and can be easily upgraded to the electronic version by purchasing the electronic grip separately.

The PCS US5 looks like a Tippmann A5 without the cyclone loader. It has a rear pistol grip, a broomstick-style front grip and MP5-style sights.

The rear portion of the rear pistol grip is removable/replaceable. The electronic PCS US5 comes with two grip inserts. One houses the trigger electronics and a battery well. The other is basically empty restricting the trigger to manual semi-automatic mode. When using the E-grip the marker features an electronic trigger w/tourney lock semi-automatic, unlocked semi-automatic, 3 shot burst or fully automatic. As you would expect, the electronic grip provides a lighter trigger pull than the manual grip. The lighter touch of the electronic grip combined with the use of a stock allows me to stay on target as I deliver several rapid-fire shots. The markerís rate of fire is 10 balls per second on fully automatic.

The electronic grip provides modular trigger electronics rather than a circuit board that is installed into the frame. The E-grip is fully self-contained so there are no wires to pinch and no circuits to cross or chip. It can be installed or removed in seconds. The PCS US5 comes with a rechargeable battery and charger.

As I mentioned above, the marker comes with a second, manual grip. With this grip installed the trigger is slower. But, it is nice to have for those days when it is threatening rain and you donít want to chance exposing your electronic grip to rainwater.

The US5 has a side-cocking handle designed to protect the markerís internals from dirt, paint and other debris.

Reliability
I have used my PCS US5 for two full years. I have yet to miss a game because my PCS US5 was not operating properly. I disassemble my marker to clean it after each day of use but thatís not always necessary. I lightly lubricate the marker once before each day of play.

The ball feed flips down to allow the use of a pull-through squeegee. I almost never chop paint with my PCS US5. I have had very good luck shooting Chronic, Scorch, Ramp, X-ball Silver and Nightmare paintballs with this marker.

Durability
After two years of frequent use the marker looks practically new. I have not replaced a single component due to wear. I did destroy a ball detent when I accidentally installed it backwards. I have also replaced a hammer spring that was bent when I bought the marker. When assembling the US5 it is important to do so with the marker in the charged (rear) position to avoid bending the hammer spring.

Ease of use
Using the manual trigger, operation is simple: press the safety to fire mode and go play. When using the electronic trigger add the following two steps: turn on the electronic grip and select a firing mode.

The selector for setting the firing mode is a single silver button on the outside of the marker near the top of the grip. Each push cycles to the next of three firing modes: semi-automatic, three round burst and fully automatic. There is no indication, LED or otherwise to which mode the marker is set.

The tourney lock is also on the grip but must be set before installing it as the switch is concealed when the grip is in place.

Ease of Maintenance
I do not consider the PCS US5 to be easy to clean. It shares a clamshell design with many other in-line design markers. Consequently, it is not easily field-strippable. You need to disassemble the entire marker to thoroughly clean it. However, you can accomplish some cleaning without disassembling the marker. Leave the marker fully assembled, but remove the barrel and flip down the ball feed, at which point you can see a large amount of the bolt. With some water in a spray bottle you should be able to do a fair job of cleaning a chop without fully disassembling the marker.

One aspect of the PCS US5 design that does contribute to ease of maintenance is the trigger assembly. Like the electronic grip, the trigger assembly is a single, self-contained piece, no loose tiny pins or springs.

I consider the US5 to have average gas efficiency.

Upgradeability.
The PCS US5 accepts Tippmann A5 or grip bottom stocks. The top of the receiver is milled to allow the use of sights with either 3/8Ē or 7/8Ē mounts. The US5 accepts Spyder/Pirahna threaded barrels.

Upgrades I have chosen:

Stock.
Iím currently using a PCS SAW stock. I have also installed a carry handle/sight rail on which I have mounted a red dot sight. Using the carry handle/sight rail raises the sight picture enough that my mask does not get in the way when I use the red dot sight.

Electric hopper.
I use a Ricochet 2KX with my US5. The 2KX uses a single 9-volt battery and is rated to support up to 14 balls per second. It works very well with the PCS US5.

Barrel kit.
The US5ís stock barrel has a fairly large bore. I found that using small bore paint with the stock barrel diminished accuracy and gas efficiency. So, I purchased an Evil Pipe barrel kit with several different size backs and fronts. I also own a BT Apex barrel. I use the Apex on wide-open fields. But most often I use the barrel kit.

Red dot (shotgun) sight.
I use the Armson Pro Dot red dot sight. I only use the sight for the first shot of each engagement but I feel that it really pays dividends. I seldom have to adjust subsequent shots for deflection, only for elevation.

Regulator.
I use both HPA and CO2 so I looked for a regulator that works well with both. I chose the Palmer Pursuit Shop Stabilizer. While this is not a necessary upgrade, the stabilizer has reduced the variation of my markerís readings at the chronograph station. I donít like my markers to shoot much over 280 FPS. Without the stabilizer I set the velocity at 270 FPS, with the stabilizer I bump it up to 275 FPS. People claim that less variation in velocity results in improved accuracy. That makes sense to me, but I havenít done any comparison testing.

Summary.
In my opinion, the PCS US5 is a very good woods ball marker and at $180, a genuine bargain.





fantastic review thanks a tonne this totally help make up my mind over the A5

thanks again
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#6 User is offline   shadow_772 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 12:56 PM

^ You might want to look into a BT-4 combat as well. I own one, and would take it over an A5 and US5.
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#7 User is offline   Weigel21 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 01:19 PM

Yeah, I've got a BT-4 Assault and while it's a decent marker I'm sure my SP-1 is even better and only slightly more than a Combat. However, Ganglyfreak is looking at a marker that can be had for well under $100 now.

This post has been edited by Weigel21: 25 March 2009 - 01:19 PM

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#8 User is offline   Tommikka 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 01:52 PM

I picked up a pair of US5s a little while ago as a bargain that could not be resisted.

These have been used as loan markers, but I have used them on occasion. They have been abused but been able to fire through any condition of paint.

The pop open feed has even allowed me to clear a break in seconds when the front man on the verge of a hill on a pathway shootout.

I used one as a compact marker for a bunker game, and as I love wooden markers have put on the Tacamo Krinkov grip:


Posted Image


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#9 User is offline   shadow_772 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:27 AM

View PostWeigel21, on Mar 25 2009, 01:19 PM, said:

Yeah, I've got a BT-4 Assault and while it's a decent marker I'm sure my SP-1 is even better and only slightly more than a Combat. However, Ganglyfreak is looking at a marker that can be had for well under $100 now.

Eeew SP :)

Kinda wish ion's were made by other companies because I don't support SP at all.. But the problem with that is they make for awesome modding projects...
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#10 User is offline   Weigel21 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:15 PM

Yeah, I hate Smart Parts for their underhanded buisness ethics which put out a lot of good companies like ICD and effectively killed the E-Mag, but it's hard to deny that their Vibe and SP-1 are great little markers for the cost.
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#11 User is offline   shadow_772 

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 07:44 AM

For the price I am sure, but I would honestly rather use a blowback than a SP marker lol.

I am thinking about buying all aftermarket parts (AC thread breach-NDZ... Etc) for the ion but nothing from SP and building off of that. Could be quite the marker and technically never was an Ion. Best part, no $ would go to SP :unsure:

Just my thoughts. Sorry to everyone for the OT.
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#12 User is offline   Gero 

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 04:28 PM

View PostWeigel21, on Mar 25 2009, 03:19 PM, said:

Yeah, I've got a BT-4 Assault and while it's a decent marker I'm sure my SP-1 is even better and only slightly more than a Combat. However, Ganglyfreak is looking at a marker that can be had for well under $100 now.


I recently bought a second US5 to have as a loaner, actually three of us bought US5s at the same time because we were able to get the marker, a mask and a CO2 bottle for about $60. I'm still as pleased with the US5 as I ever was.

I've heard good things about the BT products but have yet to actually purchase one. Although I think they are great markers I haven't found a good enough bargain to tempt me.

The SP1 is sold locally and they claim it has been a strong seller. The features and specifications sound great!
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#13 User is offline   Tommikka 

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Posted 21 November 2009 - 04:57 AM

An update on what you can do with the US5.
It is near to the A5 design, but with slight differences so kits such as the OpsGear bodies won't neessarily go straight on.

The feedneck aligns with the A5s cyclone so shrouds should have no problem there, and space is left should you want to remove the feedneck and put in a custom feed.

We set these mods up recently as my buddy is trimming down his marker collection and sold on his A5s.


G36
Easiest mod:
The stock was tight, but a bit of force to hold in place and a tap on the bolt fitted the stock.
The barrel receiver was too wide for the hole in the front shroud. It could be put on but sat slightly forward with a small but visible gap. Grinding the hole in the front shroud very slightly all around allowed it to fit.
The mag fitting bolted to the US5s front grip fitting. (I think we drilled to widen the mag fittings hole for the right size bolt)
The SA80 magazine was cut down for length.
The US5 sights were removed. (The top shroud/handle would fit with them on but was tight and would bend a little over the front sight)
Some bolts were substituted either for length to go through both the body and the shroud, or for width of the bolt because of very slight differences in the position of the bolts.

The final results were more solid then when on the original A5

Posted Image
Posted Image
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Barret
This took some more effort due to more shroud components.
The A5 Barret with a long barrel has been found to be very straight with site paint, but for a 'sniper' extremely loud, and often hard to chrono down to game limits. If the paint was well matched to the barrel it would often shoot hot. (The silencer is a dummy)

It has been a great marker with definate intimidation value, but too loud.
It is certainly too bulky and heavy for standard play but with the exception of noise and the chrono problem is right for setting up on a hill and firing on a defensive position, e.g. villages & bunkers.

The concern was how well the US5 would measure up. With the Spyder long barrel it gets the accuracy in our favourite hill spot and chronos fine.

The main shroud went on with no real problem - just the usual changing of bolts to other lengths or slimmer bolts to align with the US5s body.

The stock would not fit and align with its mount points on the shroud as it touched the back of the US5. A small bit of grinding gave the clearance required.

The bipod mount was customised only slightly with a piece of rail and bolted into the barrel shroud.

To allow the sight to be used with goggles a riser is made using a SpecOps Ion / Longbow Qbow body part and a rail. (Spare because my QBow is on a DeadlyWind body not the Blackcell body)

The barrel is temporarily blacked with tape and a dummy silencer fitted.
Posted Image
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Posted Image

This post has been edited by Tommikka: 21 November 2009 - 05:31 AM

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