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sig sauer handguns amazingly accurate

#1 User is offline   chasbronson 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 11:13 AM

Sig sauer 40 caliber 229 model.I was shocked at hitting empty propane tank at 323 feet consistantly,with walmart winchester full metal jacket rounds.We were shooting a 338 at it previously.Everyone was laughing at trying it.Was laughing.It takes a while for them to get there though.I shot , everyone started to laugh, then plink!They quit laughing. It was great.I prfer to ccw the 38 special +p concealed hammer [638] smith.Hammer doesn't catch the pocket at presentation,But the sig goes when things really matter.Wife carries 642 smith 38 +p.For simplicity ,dependability ease of carry and brute power when needed they are hard to beat.Makes a nice bang too.

This post has been edited by chasbronson: 18 July 2010 - 11:14 AM

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#2 User is offline   PistolWhipped 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 03:43 PM

Daddy likes some Sig handguns. Yes he do.

Probably one of the few handguns I'd consider in .40. If they made a single action in 9mm without the decocker, well, a man can dream.

Though you'd be surprised at just how accurate many service handguns can be, not just the Sigs.

This post has been edited by PistolWhipped: 18 July 2010 - 03:44 PM

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#3 User is offline   chasbronson 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 08:04 PM

View PostPistolWhipped, on 18 July 2010 - 04:43 PM, said:

Daddy likes some Sig handguns. Yes he do.

Probably one of the few handguns I'd consider in .40. If they made a single action in 9mm without the decocker, well, a man can dream.

Though you'd be surprised at just how accurate many service handguns can be, not just the Sigs.

Never had the op to compare the 1911 to the sig in accuracy. Any idea How they do?You don't like the decocker,or the double action? I like it for pull and shoot,without having to slide thumb the hammer.The decock works good for shooting on the range.It does fatten up the back a bit.Although it still feels better than a Glock to me.My son wants to trade his xd 40 in on a 1911 model.I'd hate to have him one up on me.Why do you prefer the 9mm?
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#4 User is offline   PistolWhipped 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 08:33 PM

I really prefer the .45 (just due to familiarity though), but I still like the 9 over the .40 due to capacity and the sharper snap of the .40 Smith. If I am going to deal with sharper snap and faster recoil over a 9 or .45, I'd just as soon take a 10mm Auto. The 10mm doesn't have that much more recoil to me.

As far as the Double action, I like Single action. I like Double action. One or the other. I just never was a fan of having the trigger pull change on me after the first shot. Granted, it's not much different in theory than shooting the trigger reset on a lot of autoloaders, but still, trigger pulls changing by over half their weight and length never appealed to me.

As far as the "more accurate" gun, most shooters can't outshoot either. Or most guns for that matter

Biggest thing with shooting a 1911 at the kinda ranges you were mentioning is the bullet drop on the .45. Normal 230 gr. ball a relatively slow round, so your looking at a couple feet at the 100 yard mark. Still, a good 1911 is easier than a lot of guns to shoot well. Same could be said for a Sig P220 SAO though.

Also saw snubbies mentioned. :tup:

And if your son wants to trade his XD in, and you're in southeastern NC, I know a guy who'd have no problem buying it. :dodgy:

This post has been edited by PistolWhipped: 18 July 2010 - 08:42 PM

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#5 User is offline   chasbronson 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 09:45 PM

View PostPistolWhipped, on 18 July 2010 - 09:33 PM, said:

I really prefer the .45 (just due to familiarity though), but I still like the 9 over the .40 due to capacity and the sharper snap of the .40 Smith. If I am going to deal with sharper snap and faster recoil over a 9 or .45, I'd just as soon take a 10mm Auto. The 10mm doesn't have that much more recoil to me.

As far as the Double action, I like Single action. I like Double action. One or the other. I just never was a fan of having the trigger pull change on me after the first shot. Granted, it's not much different in theory than shooting the trigger reset on a lot of autoloaders, but still, trigger pulls changing by over half their weight and length never appealed to me.

As far as the "more accurate" gun, most shooters can't outshoot either. Or most guns for that matter

Biggest thing with shooting a 1911 at the kinda ranges you were mentioning is the bullet drop on the .45. Normal 230 gr. ball a relatively slow round, so your looking at a couple feet at the 100 yard mark. Still, a good 1911 is easier than a lot of guns to shoot well. Same could be said for a Sig P220 SAO though.

Also saw snubbies mentioned. :(

And if your son wants to trade his XD in, and you're in southeastern NC, I know a guy who'd have no problem buying it. :dry:

Your correct about the trigger travel thing. It will trick you into thinking somethings wrong if your not used to it.ECspecially in a high stress situation.Also if you have and use multiple weapons,some being single actions.It will give you pause to pull the trigger on back after the first shot.We thought about going south a few times .We are in Pa. Hate the winters here ,[and the liberals],but that my friend is another soapbox.Went to Paintball park near Lays Lake while in Myrtle Beach one time on Saturday,big place ,but we were the only ones to show up.It was wierd.My son has to buy car insurance now so he wont be trading soon [I think].I'm sure he'll be into a 1911 soon though,HE has been lusting and molesting over them everytime we go to the gun shop.Any suggestions on what NOT to buy. The 40 xd's are nice ,but the sig will easily outshoot it,[It is a cadillac].Haven't been familiar with the 10 mm. Is it larger than 40? Is ammo readily available?The 45 round is heavy but quite effective.We don't usually pistol shoot at those ranges we were just monkeying that day.You can see the 45 and the 40 rounds going out with the naked eye if you stand slightly offset behind the shooter and look real close.That's part of its knock down power.We do love our snubbies though.[big bang].We put model 36 service grips on them[wood],fits our hand better.We dont have bear paws.
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#6 User is offline   Thalion 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 09:53 PM

10mm is a .40 with a longer case.

It's harder to find than 9mm/.40/.45, but still fairly easy to find.
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#7 User is offline   PistolWhipped 

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 10:11 PM

Depends on your budget really.

If you've got the dough, a new (or for a better proce, used) Kimber, Para, or Colt is going to be better then ome of the cheaper option. Used ones are usually already broken in too, and these all three have buttery smooth actions.

If you're going with Entry Level, Rock Island Armory 1911s are built on old WW2 Colt tooling in the Philipines and have the best trigger of the entry level options, as well as a good, if basic fit and finish. Springfield Armory 1911A1s and GI45s are a well assembled piece too, but I gotta say, stock Springfield triggers aren't the best. RIAs actually take them there. They are fantastic for the price though, and most gunsmiths can do a 1911 trigger job.

Now if you got an arm and a leg, Dan Wesson 1911s (produced by CZ) are some of my absolute favorites, but they do run a grand or better. Still, they're top quality, and he'll likely be able to pass it on to his kids one day.

As far as 10mm Auto, it's the parent to the .40 S&W, developed during the FBI trials after a shootout in Miami, where someone decided to not keep shooting when one 9mm didn't initially drop the perp (though it did damage his heart and was inevitably fatal). It is a bit longer than the .40, and as such is chambered in larger framed handguns. Power-wise, if falls above the hottest and heaviest .357 Magnums and closer to the normal .41 Magnum loads. It had the power reduced when small framed FBI accountants couldn't handle the large framed weapons and "high" recoil the round produced. The reduced power loads were called 10mm Lite or "FBI loads". Smith and Wesson just stuck that reduced load into a slightly smaller casing to produce the .40 Smith, allowing for the round to be put into 9mm sized frames.

So in essence, 10mm Auto is a magnum class .40.

This post has been edited by PistolWhipped: 19 July 2010 - 04:53 PM

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#8 User is offline   chasbronson 

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 10:00 PM

Thanks for the history and info ,didn't know all that.We looked at the Rock islands ,but wasn't sure if cheap price equated junk .They felt and looked well built.We need to find a place that rents them out and try them.You are right though, about finding a good used top line compared to a lesser new.Any tips on problems to specifically look for when checking out used 1911's.We know little about them.Thanks.
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#9 User is offline   PistolWhipped 

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 10:12 PM

Biggest thing to look and feel for is rough spots and burrs, and grit in the action. Manufacturing imperfections can hinder the reliability of the 1911 until they are polished or worn away. Biggest specific things to check is to make sure the feed ramp is nice and smooth and the chamber is throated for modern ammunition (aka can handle hollow points, not an issue with most guns made since the late seventies).

When looking at used guns, see if you can run a few rounds. If it was some dudes tinker toy, and there are issues, you can usually tell right away. Biggest issue is FTEs, which are caused by improper extractor tension or geometry. Still, it's a pretty easy fix for most gunsmiths. And you can get a little bit knocked off the price. Check the rifling (obviously) and try to make sure the parts aren't loose. Loose parts can be an indicator of garage gunsmiths, and can hurt the performance of the gun. Loose doesn't mean worn, it means things like a thumb safety that is all slack, or a grip safety that wobbles. All bad signs.

Luckily, it's easy to fix if the action is a little rough on a new gun. Just go shoot 3-4 50 round boxes of practice ball and it'll work itself out.

This post has been edited by PistolWhipped: 21 July 2010 - 10:19 PM

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#10 User is offline   chasbronson 

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 10:30 PM

View PostPistolWhipped, on 21 July 2010 - 11:12 PM, said:

Biggest thing to look and feel for is rough spots and burrs, and grit in the action. Manufacturing imperfections can hinder the reliability of the 1911 until they are polished or worn away. Biggest specific things to check is to make sure the feed ramp is nice and smooth and the chamber is throated for modern ammunition (aka can handle hollow points, not an issue with most guns made since the late seventies).

When looking at used guns, see if you can run a few rounds. If it was some dudes tinker toy, and there are issues, you can usually tell right away. Biggest issue is FTEs, which are caused by improper extractor tension or geometry. Still, it's a pretty easy fix for most gunsmiths. And you can get a little bit knocked off the price. Check the rifling (obviously) and try to make sure the parts aren't loose. Loose parts can be an indicator of garage gunsmiths, and can hurt the performance of the gun. Loose doesn't mean worn, it means things like a thumb safety that is all slack, or a grip safety that wobbles. All bad signs.

Luckily, it's easy to fix if the action is a little rough on a new gun. Just go shoot 3-4 50 round boxes of practice ball and it'll work itself out.

Thanks for the info.Will keep those tips in mind while looking.
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#11 User is offline   PistolWhipped 

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 04:11 PM

View PostPistolWhipped, on 18 July 2010 - 06:43 PM, said:

Daddy likes some Sig handguns. Yes he do.

If they made a single action in 9mm without the decocker, well, a man can dream.


Sum Bitch. They do have it.

http://www.sigsauer....8&productid=144

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http://www.sigsauer....38&productid=88

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Now. Let's just get that to less than half (more like a third) of the suggested price, and we're set. Between 2 and 3k is a bit steep for me.

This post has been edited by PistolWhipped: 26 August 2010 - 04:13 PM

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