Special Ops Paintball: First Trainning Session - Special Ops Paintball

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First Trainning Session What to do or Talk About? Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Ghost Operative 

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 07:04 PM

Ok, Heres my problem.

I wanna build a team, and from scratch, i got a decent number of player interested, all completly new to the idea of teamwork in paintball, including myself. But i have made my homework end gather all the knowledge and theory i could find on the special ops paintball forum and through the internet.

The thing is that, i have no idea how to form my newly assemble squad, i wanna organise a meeting or a practice but i dont know where to start from, shoud first talk about the position? or communication? when shoud i talk about team formation?
What kind of trainning shoud i develop?

Anyway, i will leave it like this for now.
Thanx for the help in advance
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#2 User is offline   SGT Havoc 

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 07:54 PM

so first thing starting a team from scrtach is hard me and my friend have tried and failed probably 5 or 6 times. your probably better off joinging one but if you really want to go through with it. start them off with the team work thing its difficult to learn to work as a team especially for more inexperienced players, u gotta make them understand that they need to work together to accompilish a goal

then u should work on tactics, start off with easy tactics then work your way up u should also intergrate communication into all this

dont worry about posistions to much just make sure you know who ur front players are who your rear players are and know who can lay down fire etc

This post has been edited by SGT Havoc: 31 May 2009 - 07:54 PM

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#3 User is offline   MaDuce 

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 06:57 AM

I would tell them first, what your goals for the team are. What do you want your team to accomplish? This shouldn't just be "dominate scenario games." It should also include, have fun, develop teamwork, etc.

Make sure you make it clear what you expect from team members. What commitments are they expected to keep? Monthly, or weekly practice meets? Mandatory attendance of big games? The goal here is to weed out people who are unable or unwilling to make and keep these commitments early, rather than right before a big scenario game and you don't have enough players to register as a team.

...

As far as training goes, I would avoid discussing positions initially. It's better to let your teammates simply play, and discover for themselves what position they like the most and play their best at. After a few practice games, everyone should have a good idea where they are as far as relative skill and area of expertise. Now you can start sub-dividing your team into squads accordingly.

Practice basic fire-and-maneuver drills first. The "you guys keep their heads down, while the rest of us flank" type stuff. Here, you can show them how they should properly communicate in the field. Once your teammates master the basic flank you can then work more elaborate maneuvers into their practices.

Other battlefield maneuvers such as the leapfrog retreat, should be practiced as well.

These maneuvers should be practiced, preferably, in actual games at local fields, until your teammates have mastered them.

A member here on the SpecOps forums--jonfl1 has written an excellent series on paintball tactics. http://forum.specialopspaintball.com/index...ult_type=topics
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#4 User is offline   Ghost Operative 

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 05:28 PM

Thanx alot guys, this will help me alot.

I never thought building a team would be so much of a headache.

Thanx again for ur time and knowledge.
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#5 User is offline   Saifoda2 

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:21 PM

How many guys exactly (well, give or take if you don't know for sure) do you have interested in joining? MaDuce got most of the good points, particularly about looking at jon's threads in the tactics section.


My question for you, that you should already know the answers to, (or should be asking yourself now) is what is your objective with creating this team? Every successful organization has a mission statement.
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#6 User is offline   SFC. Connell 

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 07:10 AM

Simplicity is key! Don't go crazy on drills. Just keep it simple. Show them how to run a basic formation/flank formation. Then build off that in later practices.
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#7 User is offline   rcp_90 

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 07:45 PM

I agree with all the above, especially about having a concise mission and weeding out the players who can't/shouldn't/won't be able to follow through. Even if this means your team is just you and 2 guys, then you're still sitting pretty good all told. Leadership skills take a very long time to build, and in my opinion the off-field leadership is the considerable bigger hurdle to tackle, and the less-written about one. Just take your time, don't expect the world out of yourself at first, and ease yourself into it.

As far as what to do at a practice? I'd say talk about what you want with your assembled group. Use this talk to weed out those who need weeding out, and keep an open mind for people contributing ideas that you may like. Once you get around to playing, try some organized scrimmages, and try rotating through people in any conceivable slot you may be thinking about. Yes, let somebody else try being the team leader too for the purposes of the exercise. See where people are comfortable, and adjust your practices accordingly, and most of all don't expect instant magic. Running a team is difficult, creating a team is like being in a German bondage movie. Want to get whipped to shreds, eat crap, and be generally tortured by your peers? then start a paintball team... lol

Oh, and there is no direct correlation between friends and good team members. I learned that the very hard way. And if I haven't scared you off yet, good luck :)

EDIT:
some stuff to be aware of too, good team members are not necessarily good players at first. IMHO it's preferable to take a so-so player but a great team member and have him be built up with us, because you can learn skill, you can't really learn attitude. Be aware of the following too:
- Gear does not make somebody a good player OR a good team member
- Neither does experience, particularly if they were on other teams
- If somebody is telling you why they'd be good on your team, they are most likely exaggerating, outright lying, or delusional! Don't believe talk until you see it backed up!
- Age is absolutely not an indicator of maturity. One of the biggest problem children on my last team was 32 years old, had his own fantastic setup and had paintball in his veins. But, he was a jerk. My 14 year old brother usually plays with a rental, has little skill, but is a great addition to our team because his attitude makes him great to have working under you. (Plus, it's hilarious to use him as the sacrificial goat and the go-for)

This post has been edited by rcp_90: 10 June 2009 - 07:52 PM

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#8 User is offline   Ghost Operative 

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 02:36 PM

Thanx again, sorry if i took so long replying, summer is busy over here.
And yes u guys scared me off a little, lol. but not enouph to make me retreat, ur tips ar helping me alot.
Thanx alot.
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#9 User is offline   Ziggy-TPOG 

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 11:04 AM

I know this topic is a bit old but I will add my experience, from my team, for what it's worth. Essentially the concept of developing a team, name, logo and leading was owned by me. The players that make up my team, for the most part, have been playing together since 1996. We were strictly rec/woodsball but we always spoke of trying our hand at becoming competitive but that usually occurred during post game celebrations and everyone went back to their daily lives. Once I finally decided to give it a try I again asked what everyone thought about it and of course I recieved a "HECK YEAH". So from there I started recalling previous games played and began closely observing them in our regular woodsball events. From that information and my close relationships with them an initial structure and skill base was formed.

The lesson I learned here was, with my particular crew, was to put them on a team together with you, under a no pressure environment and see where they put themselves. People will naturally lead or follow, attack or support and maintain or quit. From there a initial structure was formed and later after a few more focused practices and games under a more pressured environment a re-evaluation from the top down aided my determining of my current team climate. To date we have had no real complications or devastating disagreements. About once a year we have an ADMIN practice and bring it out on the table to decide if roles and positions need or want to changed. Like I said this is what worked for me.....





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