Special Ops Paintball: PAINTBALLS.. How they're made, care, storage .... - Special Ops Paintball

Jump to content


  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

PAINTBALLS.. How they're made, care, storage .... Info from the Draxxus Website!

#1 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Post icon  Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:39 PM

PAINTBALLS: HOW THEY’RE MADE
Taken From:
http://www.draxxus.c...lls.asp?flash=1

Paintballs are made entirely of non-toxic, food-grade ingredients.

To make the hollow shell, they first pour water into a giant, heated mixing bowl.
They add a sweetener, a preservative and a secret combination of food ingredients the company won’t divulge.
No preservatives added.

Then, finally, the key ingredient that gives the shell its shape --- gelatin.
The same kind as used in gummy bears.
They melt and mix everything for about a half an hour.
Then line it up for what they call “The Drop” –
transferring the gel from the mixer into a heated vat called the “gel tote”.

They filter out any globs that didn’t melt.
Once the gel is securely in the tote, they lower in a giant blender.
They pour in food dye and blend for about 20 minutes.

Elsewhere in the factory, they use the same method to dye what’s called “the fill” –
that’s the “paint” that goes inside the shell of the paintball.
It’s made of polyethylene glycol, the same inert liquid used for Cough Syrup,
thickened with wax - the same wax as Crayola Crayons…

The gel and the fill meet their maker in what’s known as “the feed room”.
Here, the vats of gel and fill feed a softgel encapsulation machine one floor below.
This machine is the same kind used by drug companies to make soft gel-cap medicines.
Also used to make Bath Beads, and all oil soluble nutritional supplements:
Vitamin A and E, garlic oil, fish oil, lecithin, etc.
First, the machine spreads out the gel onto a cooled drum.
This creates a continuous, thin sheet of gel called a “gel ribbon”.
This cooling cures the gelatin to the point where it can now be molded into the hollow shell of the ball.
The machine presses the gel ribbon into a die with half-circle pockets, each forming one-half of a ball shell.
The machine does the next three steps in one shot.
It aligns two half-shells together to form a hollow ball….
injects the fill...
then seals the two half-shells together.

These newly minted paintballs are still quite soft.
If they’re not carefully dried, they’ll lose their shape.
So they fall down onto a conveyer,
then roll into a tumble-dryer to be pre-dried while airborne.
From here they’ll go onto a bakery-style rack until they dry out to the carefully controlled amount.
The exact drying protocol is a carefully guarded trade secret.

To make dual-coloured paintballs, they use the exact same process,
but feed two colours of gel ribbon into the capsulation machine.
One colour for each half of the shell.

The finished paintballs go through an precision automatic counting machine.
Manufacturing this messy ammunition is a “paint-staking” process…
but well worth the effort to the millions who love the game of Paintball.
Invented just 20 years ago, it’s caught on in more than 40 countries worldwide.
0

#2 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:41 PM

HOW TO STORE PAINTBALLS...
Taken from:
http://www.draxxus.com/faqs/storing_paintb...lls.asp?flash=1

HOW TO STORE PAINTBALLS:
Correct storage of paintballs is critical to ensure the best performance and the longest possible shelf life. (“Shelf life” is the length of time any product can be stored without having a noticeable reduction in performance or value).

CORRECT STORAGE:
For best results, Keep paintballs in dry, room temperature environments as much as possible.
Word to the wise: “Never leave your paintballs anywhere that you would not leave a human baby. If the conditions would make the baby cry, they will ruin your paintballs!”

Exposure to air that is too Cold, Warm, Humid, or Dry, can drastically reduce paintball performance after only a short exposure.

COLD: Temperatures BELOW 45°F / 8°C will likely develop chronic brittleness or
severe dimples on the shell. Once degraded, there may be nothing you can do, even if you follow the procedures listed in our “How-To Remedy Brittle or Dimpled paintballs” articles on this website. When you go out to play in the cold, only take as many paintballs as you plan to use each game. Leave the rest in a warm place like a building or warm car. If you leave a case of paintballs in the staging area while you are playing a couple of winter games, chance are that the cold will ruin them.

HOT: Temperatures ABOVE 85°F / 29°C can cause performance problems including swelling, brittleness, “sweating”, and sometimes the shell becomes too “tough” and won’t break on impact. Returning this paint to ordinary room temps. for a day or two may restore them. A few days in an “Air Conditioned” room-temp. environment may restore them.

HUMIDITY will degrade paintball performance. Keep your paintballs out of the humidity. Paintballs should be stored between 35% - 50% humidity.

Once open, keep the remainder in a re-sealable bag or container.
Rubbermaid works great.
Ordinary Air Conditioning is a natural de-humidifier.
(Do NOT use a refrigerator: TOO COLD!!!)
Keeping paintballs at air-conditioned room temperature is the very best.
DRYNESS will degrade paintball performance in extreme cases. Keep your paintballs out of severe dryness. Paintballs should be stored between 35% - 50% humidity. Dryness can result in brittle or overly fragile paintballs. Introducing humidity may restore some of the desired performance. (See “How To Restore dimpled paintballs”)

CORRECT STORAGE:
Keep paintballs in dry, room temperature environment.

Word to the wise: “Never leave your paintballs anywhere that you would not leave a human baby. If the conditions would make the baby cry, they will ruin your paintballs!”


"Be sure the person you're shooting at is having as much fun as you are !!" pacman

See you out there... Dr. AxxuS & The Team at DraXxuS Paintball
0

#3 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:43 PM

How To Remedy “Dimpled” Paintballs..
Taken from:
http://www.draxxus.c...edy.asp?flash=1


How To Remedy “Dimpled” Paintballs:

On every brand of paintballs, exposure to cold weather or very dry air can cause the gelatin paintball shells to develop “dimples”, small indentations or craters on the surface. These usually result in no change in performance. In fact, Golf Balls are covered with dimples, and they fly great! Sometimes a short exposure to very cold or dry air DURING SHIPPING is enough for “dimples” to appear If your paintballs arrive dimpled, don’t panic:

After Exposure to Cold Weather during Play, Storage, or Shipment:

First of all, remember that the product may work perfectly. If you wish to take steps
to reduce the dimpling, first, simply store the paint in an ordinary room-temperature area for a day or two, and most dimples will usually vanish, and the product should perform as expected.

Another remedy for reducing paintballs dimples caused by exposure to coldness or dryness, is to expose them to some humidity, which gets "robbed away" during exposure to cold and/or dryness. You can do this by simply opening the bags and leaving them on the bathroom counter while a hot shower runs, steaming up the room for a while, then reseal the bags and return them to room temperature until game time. You may wish to “stir” the paintballs around with your hand every few minutes to ensure that they are all exposed to the moisture equally. This introduction of humidity usually aids in removal of dimples, and also it generally ensures that there is enough moisture to reduce any brittleness. Whether the dimples disappear completely or not, after these steps, the product should perform as expected, if not better.

Fortunately, while dimples may “look bad”, they usually don’t create any other side effects, and sometimes dimples can actually improve flight aerodynamics. Large amounts of money have been spent in an attempt to create a PERMANENTLY dimpled paintball, like a golf ball, since science has proven that a dimpled, spherical ball will theoretically fly better. Unfortunately, the elastic properties of the gelatin shell have thus far prohibited the making of a pre-dimpled shell.

Since Paintballs cannot yet be deliberately manufactured with dimples, you’ll probably find that your next batch will be totally normal. Remember, much of this can be remedied by buying at a local store or field instead of mailorder. Most stores will allow you to inspect Paintballs in person, before taking the product home, eliminating the risk of exposure to cold during shipping. We hope some of these ideas help you with your game…

"Be sure the person you're shooting at is having as much fun as you are !!" pacman

See you out there... Dr. AxxuS & The Team at DraXxuS Paintball
0

#4 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:46 PM

Remedies for “Brittle” Paintballs
Taken From:
http://www.draxxus.c...edy.asp?flash=1

Exposure to cold weather or very dry air can sometimes cause paintball shells to become “brittle” or fragile. Sometimes a short exposure to very cold or very dry air DURING SHIPPING or Storage is enough for “brittleness” or fragility to appear.

If your paintballs seem too brittle, don ’t panic:
FIRST: Be sure to eliminate OTHER possible causes;
  • Is your barrel TRULY CLEAN?
  • Swab or Squeegee any paint residue from your barrel
  • Use a Gelatin Build-up remover like ProTeam Products’ ”ProClean” to remove buit-up gelatin residue
  • Check for burrs, scratches or sharp snags in the breach & barrel that could cause breakage
  • Is your barrel Too Small?
  • Be sure the paintballs will “FIT” through the barrel.
  • Paintballs should be easily “blown” through the barrel, like blowing a pea through a pea-shooter (Be SURE not to Inhale!!!)
  • If the barrel is too small for the paintballs, you may need a larger barrel. Many barrel makers today make barrels of various inside-diameters for “sizing” to various different paint batches and brands. Most paintball brands today range between .680” to .692 ”.
  • Is your velocity too high?
    Using an electronic Chronograph in a Safe area, have the velocity of your marker tested to confirm that you are shooting at speeds within the Industry’s safety guidelines of 280 feet-per-second or less. (Lower at some commercial game sites.)
    Have your marker’s velocity adjusted within this range.
THEN: If you’ve ruled out the above possible causes for breakage in the marker, then your paintballs may have become brittle from exposure to cold or dry air during play, storage, or shipment:


To Restore Brittle Paintballs

First, store the paint in an ordinary room-temperature area for a day or two, (70 degrees F/21 degrees C) and the brittleness will usually vanish, and the product should perform as expected. If more is needed, move the balls around with your hand for a moment to re-orient them in the bags, and expose more of them to a few more hours of room temperature... exercise patience.

Another remedy for reviving paintballs that have become brittle due to exposure to cold/dry air, is to expose them to some humidity, which gets "robbed away" during exposure to cold and/or dryness. You can do this by simply opening the bags and leaving them on the bathroom counter while a hot shower runs for 10 – 15 minutes, "stir" the balls a time or two... then reseal the bags and return them to room temperature until you're ready to play. This added humidity absorbs into the gelatin and usually restores performance completely.

Worst case scenario, if balls still seem too brittle, somewhere between a week and a month of just sitting at room temperature will often return them to normal, as the moisture from the fill slowly “migrates” back into the shell, returning it’s resiliency.

This introduction of humidity will usually aid in removal of brittleness, and also it will generally ensure that there is enough moisture to make the shell resilient so it will work properly. Whether the brittleness disappears completely or not, after these steps, the product should perform as expected, if not better.

See you out there,
The Team at DraXxuS Paintball


"Be sure the person you're shooting at is having as much fun as you are !! " pacman

See you out there... Dr. AxxuS & The Team at DraXxuS Paintball
0

#5 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:47 PM

Paintball Fill: Instructions for removal from fabric
Taken From:
http://www.draxxus.c...nup.asp?flash=1

All brands and manufacturers of paintballs use the same general list if fill ingredients.
These ingredients are not "paint" at all, but various colorants, etc., that are all listed by the FDA and typically classified as "G.R.A.S." (Generally Regarded as Safe).

These ingredients are also used elsewhere in ordinary household products, including such examples as foods, cosmetics, and cough-and-cold remedies.

To remove paintball fill from fabrics:
The same common-sense procedures apply as those used to remove spills of other ordinary foods, jellies, beverages, etc.;

Cleaning results are most successful when performed immediately. As with every spill, the sooner it is removed, the better the expected results.
Plain water works in most circumstances, on most fabrics and materials.
Ordinary laundry detergent per the detergent manufacturer's recommendations will aid in tougher cases.
For more stubborn cases, you may consider using cold-water bleach, while diligently following the bleach manufacturer’s guidance and instructions including testing to avoid discolorations.
0

#6 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 02:00 PM

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT SIZE BARREL FOR YOUR PAINTBALLS
Taken from:
http://www.draxxus.c...fit.asp?flash=1

By the time you finish this article, you’ll know how to adapt your rig to shoot your favorite high-quality paint with noticeably better accuracy and more consistent velocity. You’ll also be able to adapt your marker to shoot on hot, super-humid days, and you may even be able to salvage a field-paint-only day from Hell, where the promoter gave in to greed, and brought in cheap junk instead of a well-known quality brand.

For any given kind of paintballs, the wrong barrel size can create an array of problems;
  • If your barrel is too small for the paintballs you’re shooting, the shell can rub against the barrel on the way through, inducing a spin, and you’re suddenly shooting accidental “curve-balls”, since a spinning sphere creates “lift”, pulling the ball in various directions. Simple physics.
  • If your barrel is WAY too small…GAK! The ball will be squeezed and may break in the barrel leaving a mess that must be squeegied out and swabbed dry before any reasonable accuracy can be restored. Not a good position to be in when you’re about to get bunkered!
  • If your barrel is way too big, it can be a problem, primarily on closed-bolt AutoCockers and `Cocker-clones. With a barrel that’s much too big, each ball can roll forward a few inches or more before firing, reducing velocity - or it may even roll all the way through! On Cockers and Cocker-copies, the correct barrel fit is absolutely critical to holding the ball in the right position for firing consistently, from the same position in the breach, shot after shot.
By understanding the “why” behind this simple science, you can make great gains in your accuracy and your shot-to-shot consistency of velocity and distance. Correct barrel-to-paintball sizing is a vital key to tight shot groupings, trouble-free marker performance, and improved velocity consistency. For this often-misunderstood concept, there’s a short explanation and a long one, but the short answer will only help you a little. Instead, we will use up-to-date technical information and physics to crush the old wives tales, myths, and mysteries about the BEST barrel/paintball size relationship, and get you some reliable accuracy you can win with.

To understand this very misunderstood technique, you must first understand some elements of the two major different marker designs, plus certain basics of paintball manufacturing, and a few simple technical concepts.

UNDERSTANDING PAINTBALL SIZES
There are definite differences in the size of paintballs that are produced by various manufacturers, and there are also slight size differences between various brands. To make it even more interesting, there are also very slight differences between “batches” and sometimes colors, made by every single manufacturer and brand.

Sometimes these differences are so small, they may only amount to the thickness of a human hair - or less.
But that tiny size variation may be the difference between the ball leaving the barrel intact and flying perfectly, or falling out of your barrel onto the ground, or possibly breaking in the barrel, rendering your marker inaccurate until you squeegee your barrel. If another Player happens to be shooting at your head at that moment, it can be very inconvenient!

UNDERSTANDING “CALIBER”
The word “Caliber” is a strange unit of measure, which divides the U.S. Standard units of inches, into metric portions. Thus, “68 Caliber” means, “Sixty eight hundredths of an Inch”, or “.68 inches”.

UNDERSTANDING MARKER and BARREL INSIDE-DIAMETER VARIATIONS
Even though all of the paintball guns on the market today are labeled as “68 caliber Paintball marker”, many of them are not 68 caliber at all. One reason for this is that there is no officially endorsed trade association, and no widely recognized industry manufacturing standards. Over the years, the inside diameter of paintball markers has changed a whole lot. Today, there are markers available with breach* and barrel inside diameters that measure FROM as small as .686, to as large as .696, more than a full caliber larger!
(*the “breach” is the area on your gun that the paintball drops into, just before firing through the barrel)

UNDERSTANDING PAINTBALL DIAMETER VARIATIONS
As you can imagine, you can also find a tremendous array of sizes among the paintballs themselves. Even though every manufacturer labels their products as “68 Caliber” paintballs, the manufacturers actually must simply do their best to find a size compromise, as they try to make a paintball that will shoot well through the wide array of inside-diameter bore sizes that are in use today. The best paintball manufacturers are striving to make a paintball that is not too big for the smaller-breach guns, and not too small for the bigger-breach guns. When you carefully analyze the paintballs manufactured today, you’ll find that 68 caliber-labeled brands range from as small as .675” up to as large as .697” (almost 70 Caliber !!). The average majority measure in the “68-and-a-half” to almost 69 caliber range.

UNDERSTANDING BALL DETENT SYSTEMS
To understand which approach to the “paintball-to-barrel” size relationship or “fit” will give you the best results, you must first review your gun’s detent system. Your marker’s vital ball-detent prevents feeding more than one paintball at a time, AND it holds the ball in place in the breach, in the same place every time, in position for firing. To make matters worse (again), not all marker companies use the same “detent system”.

OPEN BOLT/BLOW BACK MARKERS use a Detent system to hold the ball in place after it moves from the hopper into the breech. Most use a Spring-Loaded BALL DETENT, which is a metal or plastic ball that protrudes slightly into the breach (or chamber), and it remains there, “in the way”, preventing the paintball from rolling out of the breach and into (or through) the barrel. It must be checked periodically and kept clean. Paint, grit, or corrosion can foul it’s movement, preventing the ball-detent from protruding into the breach where its job is to hold the ball still. This effective system will hold even most “small” paintballs in place. During firing, the bolt shoots forward, pushes the ball into the barrel, and then instantaneously fires gas at it, before re-cocking and starting the cycle again.

This system theoretically provides a forgiving blend of both worlds; It allows gun manufacturers to use a fairly large breach, which will allow fairly large paintballs to pass through, while the ball detent will “hang on” to the smaller paintball sizes that are preferred in more advanced competition. The kinds of markers with this spring & ball detent system include low-end markers and high-priced guns too;
the popular Kingman Spyder™ line, the famous PMI Piranha™ series, National’s Rebel™, Mongoose™, ICON™, and Silver Bullet™, the ACI guns, Indian Creek™ models, and Brass Eagle’s Asian made entries, not to mention rippin’ fast tournament guns like The Bob Long Intimidator™, WDP’s Angel™, and the only non-blowback model on the list, the spool-valve powered MATRIX™, which uses not one but TWO ball detents.

TIPPMANN OWNERS ALERT: The excellent Tippmann™ markers use a very effective fiber-type detent, but it must be changed every few months to compensate for wear. Instead of a spring-loaded ball, a fibrous “flap” protrudes into the breach to do the job. However, a worn Tippman detent will periodically soften and collapse a bit, allowing some balls to roll down the barrel, double feeding, and causing breakage in the gun. Replacement fiber detents are very cheap and can be changed in a few seconds. If you shoot a Tippmann, go get some replacement detents right now. Game field operations should stock a bunch of these for every marker in the rental fleet to ensure customer satisfaction!

CLOSED-BOLT MARKERS: The correct Barrel-to-Paintball size is absolutely CRITICAL in these markers, because it is the last resort for ball retention! For purposes of maximum theoretical accuracy, Bud Orr’s legendary “WGP AutoCocker™” (and it’s many loyal custom-shop derivatives), uses a proven “closed bolt” system. Once the ball drops into the breach, the bolt moves forward and closes BEFORE FIRING, placing the ball IN FRONT OF the ball detent, prior to the trigger pull.

The closed-bolt theory is that before firing, the ball sits, momentarily undisturbed in the breach, so that it is stable at the moment of firing for enhanced accuracy. However… in this position, with the ball in front of the detent, the ball detent system is no longer effective. Thus, to take full advantage of the closed bolt requires that the ball must be held still, by means of the barrel being VERY CAREFULLY SIZED to the “average” maximum size* of the batch of paintballs that you are firing. (*measured at the largest place on the ball)

And remember, at an event where a high volume of paint is being consumed, you may enter the first day shooting one particular batch size of paintballs, only to find yourself in the semi finals shooting another batch or “lot number” from a different day of production, and then in the finals, yet another batch. No matter what brand or make of paintballs you’re using, you are always wise to double-check your barrel-to-paintball size relationship or “fit” before taking the field, in order to avoid surprise roll-outs or barrel bursts. Take nothing for granted.

It may seem that sizing barrels for the closed-bolt system seems unforgiving or too much hassle... You may wonder, “Why not just use a blowback marker or Matrix, with the more forgiving ball-detent system?” For the answer, just ask any dyed-in-the-wool `Cocker user and you’ll understand. Go ahead… try to take the “Naughty Dogs” AutoCockers™ away from them… You’d have to kill them first. People who shoot Bud’s `Cockers are usually closed-bolt fanatics, true believers, and nothing will make them change.

BARREL SELECTION: EXACTLY WHAT TO DO
Most performance oriented players have learned that a slightly smaller ball affords slight aerodynamic advantages, and they seek “small-bore” batches when they can find them. Diablo paintballs were the first to market this simple physics concept in the late 90’s, securing many wins and championships with their small-bore “Darts™” batches of their popular brands. The Darts name was actually coined at the `99 Las Vegas Open tournament. Dozens of players were shooting the new small-bore Diablo Inferno, and they all kept saying,
“ Man, this stuff shoots like DARTS!”… The name stuck and the rest is History!

BARREL KITS: The Swiss-Army Knives of Paintball
Experienced players have learned that the one-size-fits-all barrel simply does not exist today. Most seasoned competition players own a multi-bore kit, or several barrels of various inside diameters. Since the Diablo/DraXxuS brands became dominant on the scene in the late 90’s, many barrel manufacturers began manufacturing multi-caliber kits to enable people to shoot anything they encountered, from standard bore paints, to the smaller-bore competition “Darts” sizes, as well as some of the very large-caliber brands you may find at bargain-price tables at the local store. Multi-caliber barrel kits enable you to “rig” your marker to work with most of the paintball sizes you may be faced with at a tournament, scenario or big game. Sometimes at “field paint only” events you will be shooting a paintball brand that you are not used to - and the best advice is to be prepared to adapt!

Multi-size barrel kits or individual barrels of many different inside-diameters are available from;
ACI, Armson™, CP-Custom Products™, Dye™, Empire™, J&J™, Lapco™, PMI™, Smart Parts™,
32 Degrees™, etc. If you don’t want to pay the price for a kit yet, the generally accepted order for adding one barrel at a time to your collection goes something like this;
  • Most markers come with a .689-ish or so (except Tippmann, which is more like a .692 ”)
  • Next, get a .686 or .687 to handle the widest array of performance paints.
  • Next, consider a .684 for serious small-bore usage.
  • Next, to cover Big Caliber possibilities like VERY humid days when shells can swell, find a .692 or .694
  • Then, for SUPER-Small size balls, get a .679 - .682
HOW TO DECIDE ON WHICH BARREL SIZE FOR WHICH PAINTBALL DIAMETER- Method for best accuracy:

Be sure the paintballs will “FIT” through your barrel.
  • Align the SEAM or EQUATOR (usually the largest part of most paintballs) with the opening in the barrel. “Put the circle in the circle”
  • Do this at the THREADED END of the barrel that goes into the marker.
  • Paintballs should easily pass through, or at least be very easily “blown” through the barrel, with little or no resistance, like blowing a pea through a pee-shooter (Be SURE not to Inhale!!!)
  • Try this with 20 to 30 paintballs from the batch, to accommodate slight differences from ball to ball, in order to get an “average” of the general sizes within the batch you ’re shooting.
If the paintballs resist moving through the barrel, then the barrel is too small for that batch of paintballs, and you may need a larger inside-diameter barrel. Try the next larger size available, at least 2 – 3 thousandths of an inch larger. If you tried a .686”, try a .688 or .689, and repeat the process as needed.

HOT TIPS ON FIT AND ACCURACY:
OPEN BOLT/BLOW BACK BLOWBACKS: Ignore the old-fashioned rules of yesteryear, which claimed that “the ball should “just sit” at the end of the barrel, and shouldn’t move unless you blow on it hard” That rule was excellent for the Pump Guns of yesterday, which were all Closed Bolt systems without effective ball detents once they’re cocked.

Today’s Open-Bolt blowbacks and Matrixes GAIN GREAT ACCURACY from a fit where the BARREL IS JUST BIG ENOUGH FOR THE ball to just FALL RIGHT THROUGH THE BARREL, but be sure that the ball detent will hold on to the ball to prevent the ball from rolling forward into the barrel. On some markers, the amount of detent protrusion can be adjusted a bit to accommodate this setup. This low-friction “roll-through-the-barrel” setup has won many events and championships in the last several years since Diablo and DraXxuS came onto the scene.

CLOSED BOLT MARKERS: In this case, Embrace the old-fashioned rules of yesteryear, which claim that “the ball should “just sit” at the threaded end of the barrel, and won’t move unless you blow on it”. This rule was excellent for the pump guns of yesterday, which is basically what an Autococker is; A pneumatic cocking device, very rapidly cocking a kick-DUMPER pump gun.

On these closed bolt systems, which are basically without effective ball detents once they’re cocked, you NEED to carefully size and double check every time you change paint batches, just to be sure. Remember, gelatin paintball shells can swell quite a few thousandths on a humid day, and there are slight batch variations from every manufacturer. Better safe than… gakked and hunting for your squeegee when the pressure ’s on!

COMMON MISTAKE MADE BY PROS and NEWBIES ALIKE, on ALL MARKERS:
Be sure your barrel is SUPERCLEAN and free of Gelatin Buildup
  • Swab or Squeegee any paint residue from your barrel
  • Use a gelatin build-up remover like Pro-Team Products’
    “Pro-Clean” to remove built-up gelatin residue. A squeegee WILL NOT remove accumulatedgelatin. This residue builds up fast, it’s almost invisible, and it will ruin the performance of aperfectly good barrel, and you won ’t even know why. REMOVE IT!
  • Check for burrs, scratches or sharp snags in the breach & barrel that could cause breakage. Any such sharp edges must be repaired.
Armed with this information and a super-clean set of barrels in various sizes, you will notice a distinct tightening of your shot groupings, a measurable improvement in your velocity consistency, and a whole new approach to one of the most misunderstood physics concepts in our science-centered sport. You’ll find hundreds of people with dozens of contrary seat-of-the-pants opinions, but you can tell them that this one comes right out of Dr AXxuS’ paintball factory laboratories.

CORRECT STORAGE:
Keep paintballs in dry, room temperature environment.
TEMPERATURE: Store between 50°F to 86°F or 10°C to 30°C.
HUMIDITY: Store at Relative Humidity between 35% to 50%.
Word to the wise: “Never leave your paintballs anywhere that you would not leave a human baby. If the conditions would make the baby cry, they will ruin your paintballs!”
0

#7 User is offline   ZAPCOnj 

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 29-November 04

Posted 01 January 2005 - 02:02 PM

The info in this thread has been collected from the draxxus website.
www.draxxus.com
0

#8 User is offline   FIELDPEICE 

  • Poppin' Fresh Paintball
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 110
  • Joined: 04-February 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:J-town KY
  • Brigade Name:Fieldpeice

Posted 14 March 2005 - 06:47 PM

Yes I have the video that shows how thwey are made on my computer. I wish I could upload it for you all. It is great.

#63
0

#9 User is offline   AKZEL 

  • Blitzkrygier
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 187
  • Joined: 11-March 05
  • Location:New York
  • Brigade Name:AKZEL

Posted 14 March 2005 - 06:52 PM

if you send it to me on AOL, i can host it for a while.
0

#10 User is offline   FIELDPEICE 

  • Poppin' Fresh Paintball
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 110
  • Joined: 04-February 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:J-town KY
  • Brigade Name:Fieldpeice

Posted 21 June 2005 - 03:28 PM

FIELDPEICE, on Mar 14 2005, 06:47 PM, said:

Yes I have the video that shows how thwey are made on my computer. I wish I could upload it for you all. It is great.

Here it is How Paintballs Are Made

#63
0

#11 User is offline   throttlehead 

  • One of your not-so-great nightmares.
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 54
  • Joined: 20-May 05
  • Brigade Name:Throttlehead

Posted 30 June 2005 - 11:54 PM

thats a cool video, dude.
0

#12 User is offline   Sargent Mckenzy 

  • who are u and y are u reading this
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 03-April 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego CA
  • Brigade Name:sargent mckenzy

Posted 01 July 2005 - 08:25 AM

Very Informative and ZAPCOnj I thought i would never hear from you again you seemed to disapper for a while.
"I am so glad I got theses knee pads cause I spend all day on my knees!" My comander Mike before a game.
0

#13 User is offline   Ninja Jones 

  • Canadian Intergalactic Space Ninja Pimp
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1,770
  • Joined: 15-May 05
  • Location:Calgary, AB, Canada
  • Brigade Name:Ninja Jones

Posted 01 July 2005 - 03:56 PM

I seen it all on the show "How It's Made" on the discovery channel... It showed how they made these orange paintballs by draxxus... and there were also bronze and blue...
0

#14 User is offline   TIPPMANNSOULJA 

  • Forum Newbie
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 29-August 05
  • Brigade Name:Tippmannsoulja

Posted 29 August 2005 - 10:14 AM

This is about care of paintball guns, i dont know if this is the right forum but whatever. Now i have had my gun, a Tippmann 98 Custom more almost a year now and havent taken apart my gun. Most of my friends say that you need to every once in a while to clean the insides or else the gun will break. Is this true?
0

#15 User is offline   Fenrisulfr 

  • They call me "Opsy."
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 893
  • Joined: 17-May 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Brigade Name:BlackOpsGhost

Posted 11 December 2005 - 08:07 AM

Did the site disappear? The links don't work.
BOG, that was the most annoying thing I have ever had to endure, and I once watched a whole Teletubbies episode. - Hobo
I don't have MAJOR problems. I have minor annoyances that YOU consider major problems.
WARNING: Extreme sarcasm ahead.
0

Share this topic:


  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users