Special Ops Paintball: First Time Commanders - Special Ops Paintball

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First Time Commanders Started a new team; Need advice... Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   IonShot 

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 08:56 AM

In June of '07 myself and three other friends formed a small 4-man squad, to compete at a local Scenario game in August. The days slowly ended, and before I knew it, the Scenario Game had arrived, and we had no practice in. All we did during those few months, was play skirmish matches agains each other.

Now we tore apart our old squad, and came up with a new team: Echo 4-19. This year I plan on it being different, with drills, practice, and movment formations.

This is where I need help, I need to learn the following:

- Shooting Drills
- Movement Drills
- Formations
- Tactics
- Radio Chatter
- How to stay alive

In general, I need to know what actions are needed to be performed as a commander, and how to keep my team together at a scenario game.

All intel dealing with this situation would be greatly appriciated

P.S. - I have visited many of the forum threads and links dealing with my ordeal, but I want info from experienced team commanders.
"Semper Fi, Do or Die!"
-Mantra of the United States Marine Corps.
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#2 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 09:54 AM

1. Shooting drills. In paintball their are 4 basic positions of fire. Prone (laying down.) kneeling, standing, moving. Make sure your players are comfortable shooting from all 4. A good player makes himself hard to hit while shooting. This is a hard skill for you to teach players develope this as an awareness with experience, but countering this is drillable. Place a target in cover and have your players practice hitting it from all kinds of positions. Do something rotten like leave obstructions in the fire line, tree branches brush ect. They will learn to shoot in less than ideal conditions. Then try snap shooting the same way. For moving and fireing drills set up several targets and have your player shoot at them while moving from bunker to bunker, make them fire on the move not shoot from cover, move, shoot from cover. If you are the last man standing you don't have cover fire from anyone but yourself and the worst thing you can do is become a bunker monkey.


I'll type more on the other aspects tonight or tommorrow the slavemasters who control my paycheck are calling.................................
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#3 User is offline   Phoenix62187 

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 06:03 PM

Commanding is a problematic role.

If you're a sniper?
Work on your accuracy over range.
Light rifleman?
Work on your stamina and snap shooting.
And so on and so forth.

But as a commander?

I could not truthfully tell you anything that is always best.

That is why commanding is such a hard job.

Nothing is sound.

There is no tactic that cannot fail.
There is no strategy that cannot be beaten.
There is no team that has no flaw.


Commanding is not a science,
Nor is it in any way a technical exercise.



Commanding is an art.



It's knowing what to do in the heat of the moment.
It's knowing when to rush into the fray,
And when to fight another day.
It's knowing how to lead human beings as individuals.
It's knowing how to motivate and unite people.


I can tell you nothing that you could not better learn from experience.
That is what I can tell you.

The only thing that is sound
For any commander,
Is that there is no substitute for experience.

There is no substitute for the raw ability to think and lead.
There is no substitute for the time spent leading complete strangers through all manner
Of tactical nightmares.


If you want to be a better commander,
Get out with your team,
And lead them.

Ask questions.
Read books.
Think for yourself.
Take risks.
Question everything.

Become a leader,
That first and foremost.

All else will follow.
Iron Cross Recipient, D-Day 2008, for ambushing 20+ Allied Airborne soldiers with a Tac-8 pistol in broad daylight on flat open ground.
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#4 User is offline   platinum marksman 

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 09:40 PM

Props to Phoenix, who put our art in the most poetic description I've ever read.
1. Shooting drills: Prophet pretty much covered that part. By the time you guys get those down you'll be able to see where you need to improve.
2. Movement drills: This could mean several things...do you mean moving together as a team, or moving up the field? Not sure what you mean, and whole papers could be written on each subject.
3. Formations: THere are a few basic formations you might want to try. First is the "V" style. Its pretty self explanatory. This formation staggars your guys in a "V" so that they can cover more angles and flank easier. A straight line is another formation. While this formation isn't the best for moving "up" the field, its very helpful for many tactics. The last one I can think of is the stay in sight ambiguois blob formation. Basically your team moves up together based on cover and obstacles. While this formation tends to encourage dissarray among your team it does have some quite interesting and advantageous aspects. One is the ability to surround opponents in a way that doesn't give out the size of your squad. Others could be discussed later if your that curious about it.
But for the size of your team I suggest a diamond formation. In my experience this has been the easiest way to apply basic tactics while keeping my team together. You can use this formation to great success, but you need to apply your tactics very quickly. Speed is your best friend when you have such a small number. Everybody has to know their job and perform it flawlessly. Otherwise you get picked apart and destroyed. Take it from multiple experiences of mine...
4. All I'm going to reccomend to you now is the cover fire and flank. You must get this down before you try anything else. As simple as it sounds, its not. Factors change constantly and you have to react immidiately. If your slow your flank fails or your base of fire is over run. Flanking is your #1 tactic. Use it well.
5. For such a small team I would not reccommend radios. Your team will be facing such odds at scenarios that to split up would be almost suicidal. Strength is in numbers. If you must have radios give one to the commander then one to your second in command. This will keep radio chatter to a minimum. Trust me, you give everynody a radio you will have alot of senseless noise over the system. This cuts down on your reaction time.
I strongly reccommend you teach your team hand signals. Don't ask for examples, let your teammates come up with their own. You guys will know what each other is saying and you will remember them more. THen go over them each practice.
6.How to stay alive: Don't get shot. Pure and simple. If you apply all these things anyway you won't really have to worry. 'Cause your opponents will be out quicker than they can fight back.
As for stuff about commanding, you'll learn over time. A commander never stops learning, read lots and play hard. If your commander you dedication to the team is second to none. Be early to practices and leave last. Commanders are the first ones in and the last ones out.

Lead, and if necessary, use words.
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#5 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 06:04 PM

#2 Movement. As my friend and colegue Platinum mentioned whole papers could be written on movement. Maybe I will and be memorialized alongside Gramps......

But as to give you a speedy recomendation on movement drills I'll expediate the prosses. I'm going to focus on individual movement for now and squad in my formation post to come later.

A good movement drill is to place the player to be drilled at a starting point and have them move to another point while the rest of the team sets up at different locations and shoots down fire lanes in between him and his objective. Getting hit doesnt relieve you of your responsibility to get to the objective. You learn timing and angels. (I forgot to mention that the lane shooters don't get to move or reposition.) If they are plastering one side of a bunker go out the other. No one stays on the trigger forever find his cycle and move when he lets off. Another good one is find a raised position for your shooter and have your player move quickly to get "Under" the guns. I'm not 100% on this drill but it worked for a couple of teens I played with to realise the value of moving up.

Now moving in the woods before contact is made. Don't stand still. Nothing makes you stand out more than just standing there. notice how the wind moves tree branches, slightly sway like they do. Sounds wierd but works. Have on e person sit down range and just watch. Then havesomeone stealth approach and time him. Try to get where your going quickly without giving yourself up. Balance speed and stealth. (Thats right light and sound players. You can be stealthy while moving with a purpose.)

Also moving in the woods when you know the enemy is not close, run. Get farther down field than he expects you to be, before he expects you to be there is a great asset. While you moved with a purpose you may catch him stroling and directing his team, AKA Flatfooted. There are times when you know you can move without being detected use it and get where your going. It is a common complaint about snipers that they start crawling and beingall super stealthy and are so involved with that that they never get into the game.

Remember where I talked about being comfortable shooting from every position? Well get comfortable moving from any position. Be able to belly crawl forward back and side to side. Being able to wiggle on your back to get out of the fire is handy too. A methodical kneeling switch from knee to knee and slowly make forward progress is a good thing to learn to.

Next time formation.
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#6 User is offline   commando kyle 

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 03:23 AM

Pheonix... too emo for paragraphs. :)

Really, thats a good way to put it. You cant just wake up and decide to be a leader. Some people are born with it, like being able to create fine works of art. Davinci didn't roll out of the sack one day and say, " Im going to start painting." He was born with a gift, and developed that.

If you were born with it, you will develop it. If not, you can still develop the skill, but it may never be natural. Its art.


Didnt read anything after the emo kids post.Ill think about it more, Ive got a detail to do. Thats the beauty of being in a hostile foreign country... even your burn pits have to be guarded.

(by a medic, no less. :) )

(PS, dont take that emo kid thing as an insult.)
OIF '08 OEF '09-'10
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#7 User is offline   Phoenix62187 

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 08:27 AM

View Postcommando kyle, on Apr 6 2008, 05:23 AM, said:

Pheonix... too emo for paragraphs. :)

...

(PS, dont take that emo kid thing as an insult.)



Hahaha.
Emo?


I seriously laughed out loud.
:laugh:

This post has been edited by Phoenix62187: 06 April 2008 - 11:33 AM

Iron Cross Recipient, D-Day 2008, for ambushing 20+ Allied Airborne soldiers with a Tac-8 pistol in broad daylight on flat open ground.
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#8 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 10:48 PM

Practices and drills are great but they are just that. Use every scenario game as a learning tool. Look at your team's performance objectively. Look at your strengths and weaknesses and try to adjust any training to match the teams needs,
"Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war." William Shakespeare
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#9 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 10 April 2008 - 10:34 AM

Books could be and have been and will be again written about formation. Team size dictates whats available as far as formation. Terrain dictates formation. It can be maddening. The goal of formation is to make the whole stronger than the sum of its parts. The basic 2 man cover team works by one man covering the weekness of his partner and vice versa. Laying suppression fire while the other moves or you watch forward and right I watch back and left. Now if you size it up to four and move as a diamond. Each player is responsible for 90 degrees of coverage. As a large unit a point man is out front to find the enemy first. Special ops doctrine suggest this be a light rifleman or "dagger". I don't like this as daggers tend to be impatient explosive and get to far out front and get themselves killed with little more help to the squad than the warning of shoots fired and "Dead Man Walking". Outriders screen against flankers, they are outside the envelopement of ambushes and can flank and envelope for you. Also be spread apart a little bit. Paintball is a game of angles learn to attack the angles and protect yours (through squad formations) and you will win more than you lose.


So that I think covers formations how to stay alive and a little on tactics. Heres another quick one the tape line. Use it to secure one flank. The guide talks about strongside right and strongside left but not middle. That because when you take a side to push up, you never have to fear being flanked from that side. (Barring of course some NPPL Avelanch vs. Aftershock player shooting from the woods off field cheat to win thing going on). Defensively overlap the fields of fire/firelanes to make your fire more effective.

Radio chatter: Keep it short sweet and to the point. Get throat mics. When you do your pregame field walk, agree on land marks with your team so as to direct traffic with a point of refference. Think about what your telling your people. "The dude in camo behind the big tree" is a bad paintball statement. "110 feet out 4 o'clock next to (land mark 1)." is much better.
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#10 Guest_ZKM_95_*

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Posted 10 April 2008 - 01:23 PM

View PostPhoenix62187, on Apr 2 2008, 06:03 PM, said:

Commanding is a problematic role.

If you're a sniper?
Work on your accuracy over range.
Light rifleman?
Work on your stamina and snap shooting.
And so on and so forth.

But as a commander?

I could not truthfully tell you anything that is always best.

That is why commanding is such a hard job.

Nothing is sound.

There is no tactic that cannot fail.
There is no strategy that cannot be beaten.
There is no team that has no flaw.


Commanding is not a science,
Nor is it in any way a technical exercise.



Commanding is an art.



It's knowing what to do in the heat of the moment.
It's knowing when to rush into the fray,
And when to fight another day.
It's knowing how to lead human beings as individuals.
It's knowing how to motivate and unite people.


I can tell you nothing that you could not better learn from experience.
That is what I can tell you.

The only thing that is sound
For any commander,
Is that there is no substitute for experience.

There is no substitute for the raw ability to think and lead.
There is no substitute for the time spent leading complete strangers through all manner
Of tactical nightmares.


If you want to be a better commander,
Get out with your team,
And lead them.

Ask questions.
Read books.
Think for yourself.
Take risks.
Question everything.

Become a leader,
That first and foremost.

All else will follow.


I couldnt disagree more :(
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#11 User is offline   Phoenix62187 

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 05:29 AM

View PostZKM_95, on Apr 10 2008, 03:23 PM, said:

I couldnt disagree more B)


Then please tell me more than that you disagree :D
I'd like to hear your opinion.
Iron Cross Recipient, D-Day 2008, for ambushing 20+ Allied Airborne soldiers with a Tac-8 pistol in broad daylight on flat open ground.
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#12 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 09:02 AM

Pheonix you left out listen. Otherwise wise.
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#13 User is offline   Major chip Hazard 

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 08:23 PM

echo 4-19??? Hooray! A fellow halo nerd! Seriously though, experience heals all wounds.
This is a signiture. There is nothing special about this signature. Why are you reading it? Its not funny. Just a signature.

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#14 Guest_b_soukup_*

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Posted 08 May 2008 - 01:17 PM

View PostIonShot, on Apr 1 2008, 08:56 AM, said:

In June of '07 myself and three other friends formed a small 4-man squad, to compete at a local Scenario game in August. The days slowly ended, and before I knew it, the Scenario Game had arrived, and we had no practice in. All we did during those few months, was play skirmish matches agains each other.

Now we tore apart our old squad, and came up with a new team: Echo 4-19. This year I plan on it being different, with drills, practice, and movment formations.

This is where I need help, I need to learn the following:

- Shooting Drills
- Movement Drills
- Formations
- Tactics
- Radio Chatter
- How to stay alive

In general, I need to know what actions are needed to be performed as a commander, and how to keep my team together at a scenario game.

All intel dealing with this situation would be greatly appriciated

P.S. - I have visited many of the forum threads and links dealing with my ordeal, but I want info from experienced team commanders.


since your only a 4 man team i think it would be best for if you trained primarily in gurilla warfare tactics until you get more members then start training with conventional tactics. :P
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#15 User is offline   Steel Tiger 

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Posted 08 May 2008 - 02:33 PM

View PostPhoenix62187, on Apr 2 2008, 09:03 PM, said:

Commanding is a problematic role.

If you're a sniper?
Work on your accuracy over range.
Light rifleman?
Work on your stamina and snap shooting.
And so on and so forth.

But as a commander?

I could not truthfully tell you anything that is always best.

That is why commanding is such a hard job.

Nothing is sound.

There is no tactic that cannot fail.
There is no strategy that cannot be beaten.
There is no team that has no flaw.


Commanding is not a science,
Nor is it in any way a technical exercise.



Commanding is an art.



It's knowing what to do in the heat of the moment.
It's knowing when to rush into the fray,
And when to fight another day.
It's knowing how to lead human beings as individuals.
It's knowing how to motivate and unite people.


I can tell you nothing that you could not better learn from experience.
That is what I can tell you.

The only thing that is sound
For any commander,
Is that there is no substitute for experience.

There is no substitute for the raw ability to think and lead.
There is no substitute for the time spent leading complete strangers through all manner
Of tactical nightmares.


If you want to be a better commander,
Get out with your team,
And lead them.

Ask questions.
Read books.
Think for yourself.
Take risks.
Question everything.

Become a leader,
That first and foremost.

All else will follow.



That was... poetic. Kinda scary, but still, i might just print that out and hang it on my wall. :laugh:
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