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Goggle question

#1 User is offline   Terriss 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 08:09 AM

Even though winter here is still pounding strong, I want to be ready when the sun decides to rear his friendly head. So I have a question that has been on my mind for awhile.

Should goggle lesnes be replaced yearly regardless of usage?

Heres my situation. I've had my pair of goggle lenses for two years now and (to me) they look fine. They are thermal (double pane/antifog/whatever) and the only notice able change are some scratches here and there. I've read their manual and it says "replace once a year." However they look, besides the scratches, perfectly alright. My dad says "They're just like safety glasses. Unless their cracked, discolored, or scratched all to heck, no need." Personally, I don't mind if I have to replace them, but money is hard to come by here, and we'd have to order them online (I'm paranoid about identity theft).

So, do you think that the lenses should be replaced?

Thanks in advance
-Terriss

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#2 User is offline   Sniper07 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 08:25 AM

it couldn't hurt, as long as its protects you. :ghillie:
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#3 User is offline   H3 Proto 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 08:44 AM

I'd replace them. I think you're supposed to replace them regardless, you can't always see if they're damaged.

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#4 User is offline   euglow54 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 09:10 AM

I think if you search around some of the pages here, you can find your answer. Because it is a serious safety issue, I wouldn't rely entirely on the comments of members of the forum.
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#5 User is offline   Maj Tom 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 09:31 AM

I usually go 6 headshots of 6 months if I play every other weekend. But if you haven't played all that much you could stretch it as far as you felt comfortable as long as there aren't any cracks/deep scratches. It's your choice .
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#6 User is offline   paintball7410 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 11:34 AM

as tyger says, you should always check your gear and if you see even the slightest crack in your lens, get another pair in because your eyes can not be replaced but lens can.
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#7 User is offline   Disposable Hero 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:02 PM

Don't be to worried about identity theft. Make sure the site you purchase from has encryption ( most if not all do ) you'll see a little lock icon in the bottom right corner on the checkout page. Besides I think most credit cards have some sort of protection against theft, meaning that if someone were to get your card number some how you won't be liable for those purchases. Check with you credit card company if you'd like to be sure.
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#8 User is offline   motoguy1251 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:08 PM

WHAT??? Ive had mine for some time now and the lenses seem ok. I wouldnt worry roo much unless they fell unsafe.
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Posted 05 February 2007 - 01:13 PM

ide replace it. you can never be too careful, like everyone esle said, it could have damage that you cant see.
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#10 User is offline   paint rocker 

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 06:51 PM

Im an idiot :dodgy:.... when i saw this i thought it said GOOGLE question, not GOGGLE Question.
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#11 Guest_Goldsmith_*

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 06:59 PM

it depends on the lense....


if it's a JT proflex/spectra style lense... you're fine. I have personally seen those lenses (with cracks already in them) withstand 500 paintballs unloaded on them at 10 ft, all within about 10 seconds, and..... nothing happened. (to two different masks).


commonly, it starts with a hairline crack, then when a good hit happens, it makes a bigger crack, or several hairline cracks. That's when you really need to get off the field.


but yeah... look for hairline cracks in the lense. If there aren't any, then you're still good. If there are, then get new lenses.
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#12 Guest_Buckwheat_*

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 02:47 PM

I've probaly taken more then 6 headshots with my current lense, which goes align with my Proto FS. I haven't seen a crack, or any damage for that matter, so I think I'll keep them.

Anyway, I'll be getting a new mask sooner or later, so I'll avoid from spending 50 dollars on a new lense.
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#13 User is offline   Disposable Hero 

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 11:10 AM

I hear change them every year no matter what. ( even if they're not in use ) But I want to look a this logically.
When you buy a new lens, how new is it? How long has it been sitting around in some warehouse? If they were really supposed to be changed yearly they would have some sort of manufacturing date on them, don't you think?
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#14 User is offline   Warpaint 

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 12:10 PM

View PostTerriss, on Feb 5 2007, 10:09 AM, said:

Even though winter here is still pounding strong, I want to be ready when the sun decides to rear his friendly head. So I have a question that has been on my mind for awhile.

Should goggle lesnes be replaced yearly regardless of usage?

Heres my situation. I've had my pair of goggle lenses for two years now and (to me) they look fine. They are thermal (double pane/antifog/whatever) and the only notice able change are some scratches here and there. I've read their manual and it says "replace once a year." However they look, besides the scratches, perfectly alright. My dad says "They're just like safety glasses. Unless their cracked, discolored, or scratched all to heck, no need." Personally, I don't mind if I have to replace them, but money is hard to come by here, and we'd have to order them online (I'm paranoid about identity theft).

So, do you think that the lenses should be replaced?

Thanks in advance
-Terriss



I have read several articles that state lenses should be replaced yearly, but I have never seen much statistical data validating that recommendation. And if you purchase a "new" lens, how do you know how old that lens is? How long did it sit in a distributor's warehouse before being shipped to a retailer? How long did it hang on the retailer's rack before purchase? Surely, those questions can be researched and answered, but does anyone do that?

I think this is one of those, "It's not the years, it's the miles" scenarios. If you use your googles once or twice a year, never have had any serious impacts to the lens, then in that sense, it's relatively new. However, if you use it once or twice a month, and experience frequent impacts to the lens, then annual replacement is a more reasonable expense. A $12 replacement lens expense divided by 12 months divided by 2 games per month is $.50 per use...that's a fair return on investment.

To me, frequent inspection is the key. Examine your lenses before and after use, looking closely for chips, scratches, cracking or spider-web fractures, buckling or dents, and discoloration. Slightly twist or flex your lenses during inspection and listen for creaking or grating noises, which may indicate an unseen crack or fissure, or some other structural fatigue.

And remember, even a new lens will break under the right circumstances, so don't assume you are safe just because the lens is new...you should still inspect it before use.

This post has been edited by Warpaint: 08 February 2007 - 12:11 PM

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#15 User is offline   Disposable Hero 

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 03:15 PM

View PostWarpaint, on Feb 8 2007, 11:10 AM, said:

View PostTerriss, on Feb 5 2007, 10:09 AM, said:

Even though winter here is still pounding strong, I want to be ready when the sun decides to rear his friendly head. So I have a question that has been on my mind for awhile.

Should goggle lesnes be replaced yearly regardless of usage?

Heres my situation. I've had my pair of goggle lenses for two years now and (to me) they look fine. They are thermal (double pane/antifog/whatever) and the only notice able change are some scratches here and there. I've read their manual and it says "replace once a year." However they look, besides the scratches, perfectly alright. My dad says "They're just like safety glasses. Unless their cracked, discolored, or scratched all to heck, no need." Personally, I don't mind if I have to replace them, but money is hard to come by here, and we'd have to order them online (I'm paranoid about identity theft).

So, do you think that the lenses should be replaced?

Thanks in advance
-Terriss



I have read several articles that state lenses should be replaced yearly, but I have never seen much statistical data validating that recommendation. And if you purchase a "new" lens, how do you know how old that lens is? How long did it sit in a distributor's warehouse before being shipped to a retailer? How long did it hang on the retailer's rack before purchase? Surely, those questions can be researched and answered, but does anyone do that?

I think this is one of those, "It's not the years, it's the miles" scenarios. If you use your googles once or twice a year, never have had any serious impacts to the lens, then in that sense, it's relatively new. However, if you use it once or twice a month, and experience frequent impacts to the lens, then annual replacement is a more reasonable expense. A $12 replacement lens expense divided by 12 months divided by 2 games per month is $.50 per use...that's a fair return on investment.

To me, frequent inspection is the key. Examine your lenses before and after use, looking closely for chips, scratches, cracking or spider-web fractures, buckling or dents, and discoloration. Slightly twist or flex your lenses during inspection and listen for creaking or grating noises, which may indicate an unseen crack or fissure, or some other structural fatigue.

And remember, even a new lens will break under the right circumstances, so don't assume you are safe just because the lens is new...you should still inspect it before use.


My thoughts exactly!
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