Special Ops Paintball: the use of inititive - Special Ops Paintball

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the use of inititive Rate Topic: -----

#16 User is offline   Eagle Eye 

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Posted 25 May 2008 - 04:37 PM

i jokingly refer to myself as the Noob Commander. I can make walk ons do things that experienced players can't. I don't command, i suggest and let them decide what to do. Once they see that my advice is sound, i move into less of a suggestion and more of a command. I'm not the one to lead the charge from the front, as i'm not the fastest player around, but i've had my few moments. I make an aggressive first move, and have the walk ons tee off my base of fire. Sometimes, i won't give the guy time to think about it (EG: I'm gonna pound that guy, and your gonna run up to that bunker, ok? 3,2,1, go!) The last few times out the walk ons have started calling me Sarge, Commander, Fearless Leader, and Master (the last one is more of a joke on the noobs behalf). Quite frankly, i only think they follow me cause i look like i know what i'm doing with all of my gear on, lol.
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#17 User is offline   Phoenix62187 

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 10:52 PM

Eagle Eye makes a very good point;
There are certain variables that dramatically effect your ability to control the initiative of a battle.

I wear a tactical vest,
Carry a heavily modded Tippmann X7,
And use military grade equipment for everything that I do.

Now,
To an experienced player,
This means nothing more than that I either have a lot of money,
And that "...A fool and his money are soon parted",
Or that I spend a lot of time playing and care enough to invest money in my game.

To a new player,
This is something completely different.

Gear=Skill

I could be the worst player there,
But they would listen to and follow me simply on the account of my equipment.

Control of initiative can snatch victory from the jaws of defeat,
Or, less optimally,
The reverse.

Taking control of the many "small" variables can create a much larger cumulative effect on the battle.


Phoenix

This post has been edited by Phoenix62187: 27 May 2008 - 06:19 PM

Iron Cross Recipient, D-Day 2008, for ambushing 20+ Allied Airborne soldiers with a Tac-8 pistol in broad daylight on flat open ground.
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#18 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 08:53 PM

I wanted to add something to an earlier post of mine. There is another advantage to moving quickly and taking alot of ground in order to strike the enemy before he believes you capable of doing so. That is room to fall back. If you take the half way mark of the field you have more room than the enemy to fall back upon. It seems sort of negative until that day when you are pinned up against the tape line and wished you had room to fall back regroup and manuvre. Secondly by taking that space you take it away from him, denighing him the room to fall back regroup and manuvre.


I love to counter punch as a commander, but it is soooooo satisfying counter punching when you have dictated to the other commander which punch he is to throw in the first place.
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#19 User is offline   Saifoda2 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 01:23 PM

View Postprophet_subgenius, on Jun 19 2008, 08:53 PM, said:

...denighing...




I must say that is the BEST attempt I have ever seen of trying to spell "denying."
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#20 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:37 PM

The first sign of exhaustion for me is loosing all ability to spell. Fortunately I issue verbal commands at that stage of the day, as well as having my subordinates trained to understand advanced jibberish.
Paintball is a game. Win or lose you still need to wash your camo. Winners just use less soap.
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#21 User is offline   Saifoda2 

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 04:28 PM

HAR DE HAR HAR!. That's about all I can say.
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#22 User is offline   STAZ211 

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 06:50 AM

View PostNYboomer, on Apr 15 2008, 01:22 PM, said:

now i was at a big game over the weekend at west point and i noticed that amognst the walk on players all that was needed to take half the field was a person with no self preservation to lead the charge. now i was just wondering if anyone had any other examples of this or comments on it


hey man i was at that game to! what team were you on?

im one of those people. i lead a few charges during that game (including the big one at the end and big one in the beginning). really what our side lacked (the allies) were no self preservation people. there were plently of times we could have made a huge breakthrough (and twice we did. once on the right side of the field and once up the middle with the tanks.), but usualy our players were to tentative to push ahead. fore example: when its a group of about 30 allies, and there are only 5 or so N. Koreans left in their deffensive possitions, we need to push hard and we could easily shatter them. instead, im guna say 26 out of the 30 were more concered with personaly staying alive and not getting out more than the better intrest of the whole team. its things like that that made us loose.
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#23 User is offline   Eagle Eye 

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:37 PM

i agree with the no self-preservation thing. and that is when the commander needs to lead from the front (assuming he isn't worth points if killed, eg squad leader, not the uber-general.) My unit at d-day teaches that particular skill to everyone of us (we are allied spec-ops) and it pays off. I personally have led charges the last two years at d-day just by standing up and walking towards the axis. I can judge the distance where the paintballs will bounce, and when the "pansies" see me casually striding towards the enemy, they get the idea to do the same. Add some "heroic" drill-sarge-esque dialogue for flavor, and watch objectives fall before you. I mean come on, these aren't real bullets and they don't hurt that bad. and you reinsert in 30 minutes, max.

on a psychological note, it helps if you look the part. Having a bunch of expensive camo, vest, gear, ect makes the noobs think you actually know what you are doing. If you are wearing jeans, a t-shirt, and shooting a rental then the noobs aren't going to react as well. :heart:

hehe, random thought from the smiley, but seeing a ghillie monster leading a charge would be funny as hell! :ghillie:
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#24 User is offline   prophet_subgenius 

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 04:01 PM

View PostSaifoda2, on Jun 23 2008, 04:28 PM, said:

HAR DE HAR HAR!. That's about all I can say.



That was the intent
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#25 User is offline   Stang  

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 04:08 PM

Lot's of games are won and lost because of a lack of initiative. It's hard to get some groups to move, and the only real way to get progress made is to show your team that you're willing to be the first target the enemies will see.
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#26 User is offline   Phoenix62187 

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Posted 24 July 2008 - 10:13 PM

Here's another pleasant example:

For all of us who fought at D-Day 2008 and ended up at Colleville at the end of the day,
Who all remembers the hundreds of people who stood and watched as twenty people actually fought it out in the center?

There was no initiative and too much inertia on both sides.
Now and then a special forces unit would make a charge,
But most of the afternoon was spent watching only a few people fight.


What would have happened if one side had taken the initiative?
What if one army had charged en masse into Colleville?

It would have been slaughter.

He who dares,
Wins.


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Iron Cross Recipient, D-Day 2008, for ambushing 20+ Allied Airborne soldiers with a Tac-8 pistol in broad daylight on flat open ground.
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#27 User is offline   Eagle Eye 

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 12:30 AM

yes, i agree with the whole army thing, but then again if you could somehow convince the ENTIRE german army advance on colleville, i want some of what he's having. you and i both know how hard it is to get most people up to just the first set of berms for crying out loud, not to mention the 2nd berm and finally the flag. and if you could pull that off, i'm sure bill bailey, or buckshot, or who-ever was the Axis Uber-general, would hand you his rank.
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#28 User is offline   Knight Hiro 

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 10:03 AM

the use of initiative. I would call initiative more like confidence. When you do that crazy thing like run down the field, and survive, you raise peoples confidence and moral. Not every noob is the same. some are attacted simply to cool equipment and will follow them. others have to be shown the way. (crazy rush or just a lot of yelling to move up) and some, it just comes naturally. But most noobs are quite frankly scared that what they are doing is wrong. Risk is something they are not able to quite comprehend. As a commander, I teach my team risk assessment by Training with them. after the game talking to them, trying to fighure out why they did what they did. then, ever so slightly, a noobs mind transforms to what one would call their physical limits. Its kinda like what jack sparow said " the only rules that matter is this, what a man can do, and what a man can't do." teach your team to learn their limits, then my friends you will have your inititive.
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#29 User is offline   Warpaint 

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 10:56 AM

Initiative, as it applies to combat, or combat style play, is an advantage. In combat, you can exercise several types of advantage, such as force of number, technology, tactical ability, communication, organization, leadership, etc...one of the best is that of surprise. Surprise, an essential element of guerrilla combat, is used frequently by very small forces against numerically superior opponents, in hit and run attacks. The trick is to attack and inflict damage upon the opponent before the opponent can rally, regroup, organize, and engage the guerrilla forces in a coordinated counter attack...if that happens, initiative is lost by the guerrilla force, and seized by their opponent.

Initiative in people is a motivational characteristic...some people do what they think or feel must be done, without instructions, direction, or orders from someone else to do so. These people are typically defined as self-managing, and usually keep themselves busy or occupied. The advantage in their behavior is that these people never really have a boss, but someone they report to.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." ~ Edmund Burke ~ "Well...shall we?" ~ Hoot, Black Hawk Down
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