Special Ops Paintball: Responding/ dealing with an medical emergency situation - Special Ops Paintball

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Responding/ dealing with an medical emergency situation making a vid, need input.

#1 User is offline   Thumper113 

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 09:18 AM

i want to make a video on responding to a medical emergency situation in paintball (woodsball)

as most of you know paintball fields are located out in rural area's where the fire department is Volunteer and can take some time to get out to where you are, so every second counts.

this is going to be more of a guide to how to do CPR, and other basic first aid.

always check at a field you are at for the first time, and see of they have an AED so if a situation occurs you KNOW if there is an AED and if you send someone to get one, you know they will come back with one.

now im here is basically what I would do if i encounter a non-responsive person out in the woods..

-When getting certified in CPR you are suppose to make sure the scene is safe-
being in a game that is STILL going on you need to call for help immediately.. and get some people your way, now i always carry a radio when im out on the field and always ask what channel the refs operate off of (just incase if something like this would happen) while waiting for players to come i would get on the radio and declare an emergency, saying i have a non responsive player on such and such field at the north east end and the ALL GAMES NEED TO BE STOPPED! Why would i tell them to stop all games? just incase if they misheard me or if i accidentally shout out the wrong field name.


first player that arrives to assist should be told to go call 911 and get an AED, however, since most fields are out in the middle of no where, not everyone has cell reception, if the person going to get the AED is smart enough, they will have the field call it in when grabbing the AED, 2nd person that arrives i would hand my radio over too so they can relay information to the refs as to where we are, if the field HAS NO AED still send them to the main sign in area to call 911

assuming that more then 2 players would come to my aid, i would tell everyone that shows up to PUT THEIR WEAPONS DOWN!! (your less likely to get shot at when un armed.. even the refs will be stopping the game there could be 1 or 2 people that may not have heard that the game has ended..)

while waiting for players/refs/AED check for breathing by licking your hand and putting it under their mask / over their face, if they are breathing you will feel it, if person is not breathing start taking their gear off vest, pod pack, jersey, anything that will get in the way of doing CPR and using the AED.

once you have enough bodies surrounding you and the fallen player, you may take their mask off (now depending on where on the field you are you can move the person to the nearest road where its open, and roads are typically neutral zones and when the ambulance arrives you ARE RIGHT THERE!, structures like bunkers would also be about one of the safest places, how ever if the response of fellow players is fast i would immediately move the fallen player to the road.

once you start CPR, DO NOT STOP! until paramedics arrive and take over.

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Comments....

also once my little pod pack thing comes i will be stuffing a pod full of bandages, gauze, a CPR mask, it will all be included in the video when i make it.
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#2 User is offline   Myque Ace 

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 10:08 AM

This is a good start. Some of the stuff should be done differently. I have a lot of experience in medicine and emergency response...and I am sure others have some as well. So feel free to jump in here.

1. Only if you have seen the person fall AND can make sure they have not hit their head or have a neck or spine injury...you should NOT move them under any circumstances unless they are in immediate danger...electricity, avalanche, fire etc. It is best that they be properly immobilized by professionals before moving them. In addition, let the professionals remove the mask unless they are again in immediate danger or not breathing and you need to attempt rescue breathing. Same thing goes for the other equipment i.e. pod pack, harness, or vest. It should not be removed unless it can be removed without moving/rolling the injured person.

2. In alerting a response to an emergency...identify a single person to do a single task. Point at one person and say "You go get the AED and come right back!" Point at someone else and say "You go call 911...here is a script that I've kept in my ref bag for handy reference." The script should have the address, brief description of the problem...approximate distance from parking area etc. Point to one person and say "You go to the road and meet the rescue personnel and bring them here."

3. As the ref is alerted, the ref should carry a dispoasble airhorn or something to stop all games at once (three longs blasts on the air horn means emergency) all games stop immediately, barrel socks on and safeties on and markers down. All non-involved persons should exit the playing area and move to the parking area or set up area to wait for the all clear.

4. If a person has no pulse and no breathing...that does take precedence over not moving or removing equipment. Just remember every emergency is different and to be careful.

If you have questions feel free to ask away.

Oh...and what's your target audience for this video? Just curious.
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#3 User is offline   Thumper113 

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 11:00 AM

everyone involved with the sport.

at least the ones that are CPR certified and know basic first aid so they take the necessary precautions so they dont get injured while trying to help/save someones life..

il even talk about a pod first aid kit. things to stuff inside like gauze, poison ivy cream, alcohol wipes, eye dressings, band aids large patches

i ordered a Spec ops TRI POD belt pouch to put the "first aid pod" in and maybe use the other 2 for bottles of water in case if their is a player with heat exhaustion

im even going to paint this first aid pod red and use electric tape to cover part of it up so when i peal the tape away there is a clear First aid cross on it ..

and talk about the importance of players having emergency contact info ON THEM! ive seen the stack waivers the fields keep for the day and i have yet to see a waiver form that has you list allergies and what not, and flipping through the stacks to find ONE PERSONS emergency contact info on that waiver can take too long... and seeing how most spec ops vests come with ID pouches it would not be hard for players to make an "E CARD" (emergency card) to list the name of their parents, gf, wife ect with their phone number, list of ALLERGIES, and any previous injures so the first responders know!
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#4 User is offline   Tommikka 

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 12:02 PM

I would say the first thing to do is on arrival or at the game brief - find out the site facilities and procedures.
(As Myque Ace says the ref should have a method of stopping games & raising an alert)
The fact that you appear to want to produce a video of a player telling others to raise the alarm / radioing for all games to stop implies to me that if the site has a procedure for raising the alarm such as an air horn to stop all play means the you & other players do not know that is the alarm for play to stop.

Note if radioing to get refs to stop all games - why not radio for a 911 alert to be raised?

Then work from their procedure. (Bearing in mind to remind the viewer to check at each site uness you are making a video for a specific site)

Raise the alarm (By radio & runner)
Make area safe (Stopping play & putting on BBDs)
Then go into first aid procedures

On stopping play I would recommend the first measure when an alarm is raised is for every one to make safe their markers and stay where they are.
E.g. Marker safe, keep mask on, stay where they are until staff tell them to walk out.

The last thing emergency staff need is an entire paintball site walking off the field while they are heading to the incident.
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#5 User is offline   The Bear 

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 07:47 PM

One thing to keep in mind, if someone hasn't been trained/certified in 1st Aid and especially CPR they could potentially do more harm than good. If someone is in need of CPR they're essentially "dead" anyway so it's kinda hard to make that worse but my point is that I've seen properly trained people screw it up horribly, someone who hasn't been trained probably doesn't stand a chance. The biggest dangers being someone not checking vitals properly and either trying to do CPR on someone who doesn't need it (risk of broken ribs, punctured lung, even death, etc. on a person who would otherwise be ok) or not caring for someone who does need help. There's also a large risk of contagious disease such as Hepatitis and HIV that responders need to be aware of and trained to handle.

I'm not trying to shoot down your movie at all, I'll be the first to support anything that helps the sport/other people, I just want people to be aware of the risks. Showing people how to respond is great, but might want to add something in there stating that proper training should be involved.
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#6 User is offline   burntearth 

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 09:12 PM

View PostThe Bear, on Jan 27 2010, 07:47 PM, said:

One thing to keep in mind, if someone hasn't been trained/certified in 1st Aid and especially CPR they could potentially do more harm than good. If someone is in need of CPR they're essentially "dead" anyway so it's kinda hard to make that worse but my point is that I've seen properly trained people screw it up horribly, someone who hasn't been trained probably doesn't stand a chance. The biggest dangers being someone not checking vitals properly and either trying to do CPR on someone who doesn't need it (risk of broken ribs, punctured lung, even death, etc. on a person who would otherwise be ok) or not caring for someone who does need help. There's also a large risk of contagious disease such as Hepatitis and HIV that responders need to be aware of and trained to handle.

I'm not trying to shoot down your movie at all, I'll be the first to support anything that helps the sport/other people, I just want people to be aware of the risks. Showing people how to respond is great, but might want to add something in there stating that proper training should be involved.


I'll second this...I'm all for first aid training, however if it's not used regularly, it's still best to leave the CPR/AED use to the professionals. Training someone how to do CPR/use an AED if you're not adequately certified can lead to liability for everyone involved.

As for making a first aid kit, the simpler the better - band aids/liquid bandaid, polysporin, and maybe some saline. Anything else requiring more should be directed to EMS/their doctor.

Don't forget the old EMS line "If it's wet and sticky, and not yours, don't touch it." There are a few different ways to check breathing without removing a person's mask other than licking your hand (chest movement, fogging on the mask) until someone can control C-spine and safely remove the mask (same as removing a motorcycle helmet).

Speaking of C-spine, I echo Myque Ace - if trauma is suspected, ALWAYS take c-spine and leave the patient as found. You can do WAY more damage by carting the injured all over the place than if he was left in the same spot, and EMS came to him (that's what quads and Gators are for, not to mention scoop stretchers and Stokes baskets).
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#7 User is offline   The Bear 

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:20 PM

A few things that might be good in the video are the more common issues often seen on the paintball field such as dehydration and heat exhaustion/stroke. Even being aware of the issues I still found myself suffering from serious dehydration at a tournament last summer. I had to drop out of one of the events and almost couldn't compete in the main tournament. If it weren't for myself and another player at the field being trained in 1st aid I most likely would have ended up in the hospital.

It's very easy for these conditions to sneak up on people and they can develop very quickly under the right circumstances. They can also be very serious if not treated quickly and correctly. Some conditions can also assist others in developing. Sunburn and dehydration can be factors in developing heat exhaustion which can lead to heatstroke and eventually hyperthermia. Some signs can also be mistaken for simply being tired out from playing, so knowing what to look for is doubly important.

Here is a website with a basic rundown on the symptoms and treatment if your interested, though for your movie I would recommend some additional research.

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#8 User is offline   MAVERICK2008 

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 12:31 PM

I was certified as a lifeguard and in water park safety as well as had lots if training in CPR, and First Aid. Always stress don't panic.
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#9 User is offline   Thumper113 

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:16 PM

View PostMAVERICK2008, on Feb 17 2010, 01:31 PM, said:

I was certified as a lifeguard and in water park safety as well as had lots if training in CPR, and First Aid. Always stress don't panic.

my brother is too..

although some of the lifeguards in my building are just plain old boxes of rocks..

its more of a social club then a job to them.

me and my brother use to watch them do inservice and the things he pointed out.. made me wana keep my future kids away from that place.
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Posted 17 May 2010 - 06:08 AM

Glad I took the time to get certified in CPR, Heimlich and AED. I'm also a bio major with a secondary in premed so I know a good bit about first aid. Hopefully I will never have to use those skills.
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#11 User is offline   jtpaintball70 

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 07:14 AM

One thing to add that is coming in with research. Don't bother with breaths. Compression only CPR is being shown to be more effective. Even as field providers who can secure the airway better than a pocket mask, we do 200 compressions before we even stop once to toss an airway in or bag in two breaths
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