Special Ops Paintball: A Friendly Reminder... - Special Ops Paintball

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A Friendly Reminder... Not just poison Ivy, but ticks too!

#1 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 21 May 2007 - 11:00 AM

seeing as that its summer and all, i figured as one of my first posts in the forums i would add a lil friendly advice with all you other woodsballers out there... not only watch out for the poison ivy and such(i love and appreciate the very detailed post about it), but ticks too can cause problems. i figure that i might as well put this out there seeing as that i had a lil encounter with ticks this weekend during some training i was doing in the woods.

I will admit that for the past few years(or i should say 7 years) i havent really worried about ticks. i have but i never really thought that much about it untill now. This past weekend i didnt some training with a few friends, just getting used to the woods, silent walking, some concealment and stealth tactics(crawling, hittin the deck, that sort of thing), and when we were all done, my friends found a few ticks on them.
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Being a sniper, i kno that others like myself tend to spend most of a game lying on the grown, creeping around in the leaves. I know for a fact that some like to throw some leaves on top of themsevles to help better conceal thier posistion(ive done it even with a ghillie). But even if ur not a sniper, you can still get ticks on you very easily... the following information below is from WebMD, about how to prevent, remove PROPERLY, and other information involving ticks. The reason i feel really strong about this issue is my stepfather(god rest his soul), had gotten a tick bite and contracted Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. And despite what you may think, you can get ticks from the bushes and trees in your own yard. soo, no more of my story, just onto the information.

My last lil tidbit, an idea as u may call it... use some bug spray, not only on urself, but spray your camos, ghillie, vest, ect. try to take some precautions, id hate to hear about some paintballers gettin really sick from enjoying a game we all love!
Thanks! DaGhost of Ghost.Mob

Spring is a time when many people spend more time outdoors, so it's important to remember how to prevent tick bites.

Some of the more common diseases that you can get from a tick bite include:


babesiosis
ehrlichiosis
Lyme disease
Q-fever
Rocky Mountain spotted fever
Southern tick-associated rash illness
tick-borne relapsing fever
tularemia



Other diseases that you can get from a tick in the United States include anaplasmosis, Colorado tick fever, and Powassan encephalitis.

Some species and some life stages of ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see, but all hungrily look for animals and, sometimes, people to bite. Depending on the species, you can find ticks in various environments, often in or near wooded areas. You may come into contact with ticks when walking through infested areas or by brushing up against infested vegetation (such as leaf litter or shrubs). Ticks also feed on mammals and birds, which play a role in maintaining ticks and the pathogens they carry.

Tick-borne diseases can occur worldwide. Fortunately, there are some simple steps you can take to protect yourself and your family:

Protect yourself from tick bites
Avoid tick-infested areas. Many local health departments, parks, and cooperative extension services have information about the areas most infested with ticks. If you are in a tick-infested area, walk in the center of the trails to avoid contact with vegetation.

Wear light-colored clothing, which allows you to see ticks that are crawling on your clothing. Tuck your pant legs into your socks so that ticks cannot crawl up inside of your pant legs. Some ticks can crawl down into shoes and are small enough to crawl through most socks. When traveling in areas with lone star ticks (which are associated with Southern tick-associated rash illness, ehrlichiosis, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever) you should examine your feet and ankles to ensure that ticks are not attached.

Use chemical repellent with DEET or permethrin and wear protective clothing. Repellents containing permethrin can be sprayed on boots and clothing. When used in this manner, the repellent will be protective for several days. Repellents containing DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can be applied to the skin, but they protect for only a few hours before reapplication is necessary. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding the hands, eyes, and mouth. An alternative to DEET, picaridin, has recently become available in the United States. Picaridin has limited data published for tick repellency, but it may provide suitable protection.




Perform daily tick checks
Check your body for ticks after being outdoors, even in your own yard. Conduct a body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas by searching your entire body for ticks. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body and remove any tick you find (see the "Safely remove ticks" section below for instructions on removing ticks). Check these parts of your body and your child's body for ticks:
Under the arms
In and around the ears
Inside belly button
Back of the knees
In and around the hair
Between the legs
Around the waist

Check your children for ticks, especially in the hair, when returning from potentially tick-infested areas. See the list above for the places on your child's body to check for ticks. Remove any tick you find on your child's body.

Check your clothing and pets for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing and pets. Both should be examined carefully, and any ticks that are found should be removed. Placing clothes into a dryer on high heat effectively kills ticks. See the "Prevent ticks on animals" section of this page for more information.

Safely remove ticks
Early tick removal may reduce the risk of infection of some tick-borne diseases. Follow the steps below to safely remove ticks from animals and humans:


Use fine-tipped tweezers and protect bare hands with a tissue or gloves to avoid contact with tick fluids.
Grab the tick close to the skin. Do not twist or jerk the tick, as this may cause the mouthparts to break off and remain in the skin.
Gently pull straight up until all parts of the tick are removed.
After removing the tick, wash your hands with soap and water (or waterless alcohol-based hand rubs when soap is not available). Clean the tick bite with an antiseptic such as iodine scrub, rubbing alcohol, or water containing detergents.



Watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever, and see a health care provider if these develop. For fully detailed information about tick removal, see the Rocky Mountain spotted fever Web site.

Reduce ticks in your yard
Modify your landscape to create Tick-Safe Zones. Some ticks, such as deer ticks, need moist environments to survive; they die quickly where it is dry. Thus, there are a few tricks you can use to keep ticks away from areas of the yard where you spend the most time. Laying down wood chips or gravel where lawns butt up against wooded areas can reduce the number of ticks on grassy areas by creating a drying barrier between the more heavily tick-infested vegetation areas and the grass.

Control vegetation and maintain a clean yard. Mow the lawn, clear brush and leaf litter, keep the ground under bird feeders clean, and stack woodpiles neatly in dry areas.

Provide a vegetation-free play area. Keep play areas and playground equipment away from away from shrubs, bushes, and other vegetation.

Use a chemical control agent. Effective tick control chemicals are available for use by the homeowner, or they can be applied by a professional pest control expert. If you use the household products, be sure to follow the instructions carefully to provide the appropriate amount and distribution of the chemical.

Use bait boxes to treat rodents. "Bait boxes" that treat wild rodents with acaricide (pesticides that that kill ticks) are now available for home use. Properly used, these boxes have been shown to reduce deer ticks around homes by more than 50%. The treatment is similar to products used to control ticks and fleas on pets and does not harm the rodents. Bait boxes are available from licensed pest control companies in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Prevent deer from bringing ticks into your yard. Deer can carry ticks that spread Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and Southern tick-associated rash illness. Removing plants that attract deer and constructing physical barriers may help discourage tick-infested deer from coming near homes.

Information taken from 'How to protect your family from ticks', WebMD.com. For more info, go to WebMD.com and search 'Ticks'
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Posted 21 May 2007 - 03:28 PM

id also reccomend getting 100% deet, usualy what you find in off containers is only 5-25% deet. even the deep woods uber super strong off is at best 40%, buy 100%
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#3 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 21 May 2007 - 03:33 PM

Ive done some research and there are special outdoor products that you can treat your camos with that are non toxic, odorless, and will leave your goodies treated for up to 2 weeks, granted if u get tagged alot, ur gonna wanna wash ur stuff, but either way, i dont think its that much, but still.. its worth it to stay protected, better safe than sorry i say!
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#4 User is offline   The Angry Platypus 

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Posted 21 May 2007 - 08:01 PM

a tick crawled across my eyelashes once. I totally freaked and started hyperventilating.
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#5 User is offline   jtpaintball70 

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Posted 21 May 2007 - 10:09 PM

great advice for anyone going to ok d-day. that place has tons of them.
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#6 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 08:41 AM

CO2 also attracts ticks. I that on Animal Planet and I don't just mean what is used in our markers but what we produce from just breathing. You kind of have to wonder though if you are using CO2 as a propellent, will it also attract the ticks?
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#7 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 03:21 PM

View PostKnightwolf16, on May 22 2007, 08:41 AM, said:

CO2 also attracts ticks. I that on Animal Planet and I don't just mean what is used in our markers but what we produce from just breathing. You kind of have to wonder though if you are using CO2 as a propellent, will it also attract the ticks?

this is very true.. not only is it the CO2, but they can sense vibrations and movement, and thats when they actively search for a host. as for running CO2 on ur guns, it would prolly attract them, but again.. even more of a reason to use caution and protect yourself... and if u really read about ticks, they can be active all year round too, not just spring and summer... just a thought, but its true!
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Posted 22 May 2007 - 10:55 PM

View PostGhost.Mob.One, on May 21 2007, 04:33 PM, said:

Ive done some research and there are special outdoor products that you can treat your camos with that are non toxic, odorless, and will leave your goodies treated for up to 2 weeks, granted if u get tagged alot, ur gonna wanna wash ur stuff, but either way, i dont think its that much, but still.. its worth it to stay protected, better safe than sorry i say!


do you perhaps know of the product name? so that we might look into it for our gear
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#9 User is offline   Ravenlord 

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 03:13 PM

mmm %100 deet, feels just like bacon grease when its spread on.
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#10 User is offline   paintslinger99 

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 03:14 PM

this should be stickied if a mod is reading this
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#11 User is offline   THE GIVEN DEATH 

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 06:47 PM

I'll DEFINITELY agree with the whole tick issue, as I pulled two of them off my head after a game today, even after i scrubbed myself down in the shower. I was lucky too, because my girlfirend spotted them. If she was not here, i would have never known they were there.

A tip for y'all, Target almost ALWAYS has the 100% DEET bug spray in stock. I keep a small bottle of it on me at all times when we play, but stupid me decided that i didn't really need it today :)
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#12 User is offline   Brandon Dolan 

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Post icon  Posted 29 May 2007 - 06:44 PM

I have never had this happen to me.
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#13 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 07:18 AM

I use the Repel Sportsmen Max. It has 40% DEET and works on clothing. I've never had a tick on my while using this stuff while others in my group ended up with multiple ticks!!
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#14 User is offline   Ghost.Mob.One 

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 04:06 PM

Sorry it took me a while.. new job and tryin to get as many hours as possible to get a new gun(my tipp custom 98 was stolen damnit!), but theres a product by a company called Sawyer that if i remember correctly from reading about it is used by the military, its not AS strong as what the military uses, but its the same method that they use(instead of a spray, u soak ur gear for 2 hours and it lasts 6 weeks..) They also have spray applications too! the best way to find the products i found is to either go to ur local outdoors shop, a target or something.. or just google 'tick spray for clothes'! heres the link i found for it...
http://www.permethri...om/products.htm
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#15 User is offline   Knightwolf16 

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 08:34 AM

Don't forget that ticks aren't the only insect that can carry disease. Mosquito's are an even bigger thread and can carry yellow fever, malaria, EEE, and a number of other potentially fatal diseases.
"Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war." William Shakespeare
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